Registration card of Thomas Gerald Pike, of Walford, Market Hill, St Brelade, born 03/05/1883

Reference: D/S/A/1/A1031

Date: January 13th 1941 - January 13th 1941

Testament of Thomas Tilley Podger, saddler and harness maker, of 17, Gloucester Street, St Helier. Dated: 17/11/1884

Reference: D/Y/A/49/32

Date: May 20th 1890 - May 20th 1890

Testament of Louisa Anne Mourant, 26 Burrard Street, St Helier, widow of Harecourt Campbell Carter Hart. Dated 12 May 1925. Bequeaths the business of saddler to George Herbert Hart.

Reference: D/Y/A/90/71

Date: May 6th 1930 - May 6th 1930

Images of Len Pipon, a farmer from St Lawrence who farmed using all the old traditional methods. Mr Pipon appears to be demonstrating how to reupholster an item of horse tack equipment.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/2/3502

Date: March 21st 1977 - March 21st 1977

Photographer: Peter Mourant

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1977/3502.

Account sent to Philippe Le Gros by Henri Nicolle

Reference: L/C/112/G2/106

Date: 1833 - 1833

Letter from W Jackson, Saddler, Oxford to J Pipon, La Hague concerning a draft for his bill given to Jackson by Mr Ballein

Reference: L/C/65/C4/23

Date: August 25th 1807 - August 25th 1807

Jersey Talking Magazine-August Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Nature feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about herbs and the herb garden at Quetteville Mill. Guernsey Feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to Mr Le Cornu, a saddler, about his trade and the need for it and the people to take his place after he has retired. Rosemary Gilchrist reading an article by Doreen Hart concerning breeding guide dogs. Glen Williams of Glensounds, a reader, talking about the archaeological exploration in Jersey and his thoughts on La Hougue Bie, the old religions, witches and goddesses. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for leos this year. Gordon Young announcing the result of the quiz and setting the quiz for the month. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd interviewing four previous Miss Battle of Flowers and the current one. Maureen Wakeham, née Hobbs, Miss Battle of Flowers in 1954, the second Miss Battle of Flowers talking about entering the competition, the girl who won in the first year, Trina van Dorn, her ambition, Mr Battle-Anthony Steel. Peggy Poole, Miss Battle of Flowers 1958, what her husband thought of it, Mr Battle James Robinson-Justice, what she remembers about the day, what she did for the rest of the year, her daughter winning the Miss Battle of Flowers competition, what she thinks about it as a beauty competition. Marianne Rosler, née de la Perrelle, Miss Battle of Flowers 1961 talking about entering Miss Battle of Flowers, Miss Battle of Flowers as a beauty competition, her hopes for her daughter to enter the competition, Mr Battle-Eric Robinson, the day of the Battle of Flowers, memories of the day. Mary Horton, Miss Battle of Flowers 1972 about what made her enter, Miss Battle of Flowers as a beauty competition, Mr Battle-Jimmy Saville, memories of the year. Karen Poole-Miss Battle of Flowers 1980 talking about entering the competition, questions she was asked, how she felt when she found out she had won, the Miss World competition, what she had done so far, looking for Mr Battle. Frank Morin talking about his job at A de Gruchy when he joined as an apprentice in 1921, the shop at that time, suppliers for the shop and buying for the shop. Gordon Young ends with a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/45

Date: July 31st 1980 - July 31st 1980

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

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