Scrapbook containing Evening Post newspaper cuttings from 19th June 1940 to 21st July 1944 compiled by Dr Walter J Le Quesne concerning all aspects of the german occupation

Reference: L/D/25/M5/3

Date: June 19th 1940 - July 21st 1944

Scrapbook containing Evening Post newspaper cuttings from 11th July 1944 to 26th June 1945 compiled by Dr Walter J Le Quesne concerning all aspects of the german occupation.

Reference: L/D/25/M5/4

Date: July 11th 1944 - June 26th 1945

Warrant from Charles II to the Bailiffs, Jurats and Deans of the islands of Jersey and Guernsey. The warrant orders that the holders of Channel Islands scholarships at Oxford endowed by his late father be given preference when they come to make nominations for the five Channel Island fellowships newly-founded and endowed by the Bishop of Winchester

Reference: L/F/08/H/43

Date: December 11th 1678 - December 11th 1678

Oxford University

Reference: L/F/22/D

Copies of royal grants to the University of Oxford

Reference: L/F/22/D/1

Date: 1635 - 1636

Copies of the royal grant to the University of Oxford

Reference: L/F/22/D/2

Date: 1635 - 1636

Copies of grant of Charles I to the University of Oxford

Reference: L/F/22/D/3

Date: 1635 - 1636

Note giving details of a meeting to explain university application procedures

Reference: L/G/02/D3/17

Date: July 1st 2003 - July 1st 2003

Maria Mallett, A girl, Kenneth Mallett and Tim Bowden in the sitting room of the Mallett family home in Oak Tree Gardens. Tim is due to return to Southampton University to finish the last year of his master's degree.

Reference: p/03/398/17

Date: September 27th 2000 - September 27th 2000

Photographic slide of a group of Geography PGCE students from the Institute of Education London University with Ashley Kent and a group from Les Quennevais School (Mrs U Mills) at L'Etacquerel

Reference: P/09/A/2102

Date: March 27th 1981 - March 27th 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-April Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Philip Gurdon interviewing Ken Ball, an amateur radio enthusiast, about the equipment for his amateur radio station, the regulations involved in broadcasting amateur radio, the Radio Society of Great Britain, the examinations needed to be sat to operate an amateur radio, a blind operator, communicating with people throughout the world on the radio, listening to an amateur broadcaster from London and Malta and talking to people across the world. Joan Stevens taking a tour around St Ouen about it being the biggest parish in the island but one of the smallest population, named after a 7th century bishop of Rouen with a relic that was placed in the church, St Ouen's Church-the date it was built, St Ouen's Bay which is actually in three parishes, La Rocco Tower built between 1796 and 1800-a Jersey round tower-last to be built, was falling apart-during the occupation used as target practice, tower repaired. Vinchelez de Haut and Vinchelez de Bas Manor's-architectural details of the manors, Abraham Le Sueur was killed at Vinchelez de Bas by a falling rock, St Ouen's Manor-biggest and oldest manor in island, parts that date back to 1135 to the de Carteret families, 1490-fortified and crenellated by then seigneur of St Ouen in fear of attack, over years altered a great deal, 1670-restoration, later fell into disrepair-de Carteret family important in England, passed to the Malet de Carterets-Colonel Malet de Carteret-1860s-started large scale restorations until 1880-appearance there is today, Le Pinnacle-important site-centre of pilgrimage for over 2000 years, worry of erosion and vandalism, lovely area of flora, windmills and dolmens in parish-Moulin de la Mare did exist where Val de la Mar exists-a seigneurial mill-used by the public. L'Etacq-name from an old norse name, had a martello tower on it-L'Etacquerel-removed by germans during the occupation, lead found up at L'Etacq, vraic collected from L'Etacq which was used as compost, caves, Les Mielles-being kept as conservation centre, needs to be kept natural so it is not destroyed. Excerpt from a Midsummer Night's Dream, the first time Shakespeare had been performed at the Jersey Opera House for a number of years, featuring Sonia Hamon and Rosemary and Hilary Lissenden. Horoscope Feature-Diane Postlethwaite giving a forecast for the year for aries. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd describing the view from her house and the joys of spring with Gordon Young reading the poem 'I wander lonely as a cloud'. Vicki Stuckey talking to Lloyd Cornish of Elle, who provides wedding dresses asking what brides are wearing nowadays, what they should look for in a wedding dress, the colour and length of the wedding dress, the fashions, the expense of the dress, the style of veil and headdress, the design of Lady Diana's wedding dress. Beth Lloyd talking to Jeffrey Archer about his latest book 'Cain and Abel', the research that went into the book, his university days and running, keeping fit, becoming the youngest member of the Greater London Council, becoming a member of parliament, losing a million pounds with a bad investment, writing his first book based on his experiences, deciding to continue writing, his desire to get back in to politics and his decision to put it on hold, his next book, a sequel to 'Cain and Abel', his plans for the foreseeable future, an invitation to meet the Emperor of Japan and his pride in being published in Braille. Di Weber went to the Mont Felard Hotel asking Steve, the chef, how he copes with cooking for so many people, what he enjoys cooking the most, his hours at the hotel and Renata a waitress about working as a waitress, learning how to serve people, why she likes the job and where she comes from and Jill, the receptionist talking about her duties, difficult customers and living in the hotel. Gordon Young tells a humorous story. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/53

Date: March 31st 1981 - March 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-November Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviews Max Bygraves, who has just completed a summer season in Jersey and asks what he thought of Jersey, the speed the time went in Jersey, his decision to do a summer season in Jersey, eating good food in restaurants in Jersey, the success of the summer, the secret of his success, telling a funny story, his records, how he started recording, whether he considers himself a singer or comedian-an entertainer, how he changes his act, working in America and what he is doing after leaving Jersey-a charity concert and a song by Max Bygraves. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins giving some recipes for easy soups. Norah Bryan interviewing Dr Samuel Macey, a professor of English at the University of British Columbia who started by running a wholesale business in Jersey, about how it had all come about, retiring at 35 and educating himself, moved to Canada and moved into education, gained a degree and PhD, began teaching english literature at the University of British Columbia and became assistant dean of graduate studies, interest in time, books that are concerned with time and clocks, finding out about time and clocks on a year of sabbatical travelling around the world, interesting clocks in Jersey and the differences in Jersey since he previously lived here. Pat Dubras performing a short story called 'When a Young Man's Fancy' by Diana Childe. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting the Normandy Landing Beaches describing the museum of St Mere d'Eglise and its exhibits with stories of the battles and occurrences in the town and the people involved and describing the cemeteries and the memorials to the people who died during the second world war and describing the beach and at Aramanche describing the scene and a german cemetery. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/59

Date: October 31st 1981 - October 31st 1981

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1983. Introduction by Gordon Young. Ideal Homes Exhibition at Fort Regent last month. Beth Lloyd talking to a person on a stand about a talking oven for the blind, how it works and how much it may cost when it is released. Ruby Bernstein telling a story of a dog that followed her and her difficulty in trying to escape from it. Nature Feature-Frances Le Sueur talking about owls including examples of its call. Bob Evans interviewing Group Captain Fred Winterbottom talking about his early life, going on a trip through Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand and India-seeing the Empire as it was before the first world war, returned before first world war began, joined a regiment and became a cavalry man, becoming a fighter pilot during the first world war, getting shot down and captured and was in a POW camp. How he became interested in the intelligence service, built up the air service of the secret service and some of the information he discovered. Paul Brown interviewed Harold MacMillan as a student at Leeds University and asked him who were the great Statesmen in the world that he had met including Jack Kennedy, Charles de Gaulle, what particularly inspired him in a man, who inspires him today and if he was a young man what he would strive towards in the current world. End of Side One. Gordon Young interviewing Jack Worrall at St Mark's Church about how church bells are rung, how he got interested in bell ringing, the ban on bells being rung being lifted in 1943, how bells are rung, the clock installed in St Mark's Church in 1880-dedicated to Charles William Robin, getting to the top of the clock tower to see the bells, the names of the bells, how the bells are hung, what you have to do to get the bells into the ringing position, the stay-can rest the bell on it so as not to have to pull the bell each time and it is a safety feature, the mechanics of bell ringing, the bells being made of copper and tin and the noise of the bell. Jack Worrall talking about the history of the bells in the church, the sally-the place that is pulled on the rope, the dangerous things that can happen, hand ringing bells, a spirit of comradeship between bell ringers-ringing bells for Charles Lovett whose golden wedding anniversary is being celebrated, the physical effort of bell ringing, sequences of bells ringing during a peal including examples on the hand bells, mistakes made during bell ringing and how the bells are played and conducted. Describing how the bells are pulled and talking about how hard it is getting the bell into position. Listening to the peal of church bells. Margaret Jenkins reading a poem by Stanley Holloway. Gordon Young finishing with a joke. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/05/B/71

Date: October 31st 1983 - October 31st 1983

Personal View of Michael Day, Director of the Jersey Heritage Trust, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was not interested in museums or collecting as a child-was interested in collecting train numbers. Got a passion for football-wanted to be a goalkeeper for Aston Villa-played for local league team. Was born in Nottingham-a midlander. Went to Nottingham High School from 8-18-a public school and got the exams he needed to get. Enjoyed part of his school days-got involved in things with enthusiasm-responded to the teachers-struggled at history at school. Enjoyed sport-his father played cricket throughout his life-is interested in all sports. He has a brother who is 2½ years younger than him who is an equestrian competitor. When he went into sixth form he wanted to get into languages but then realised he didn't like them-applied to do English at Leeds University. First Record-Some Kinda Wonderful by The Q-Tips. Enjoys modern rock music. Was nervous about University but when he realised people were feeling the same he was alright. He read English but as an option he took a course on folk life studies which he got really interested in-pursued this interest avidly which led him to museums. Was interested in folk music-in the early 70s he collected songs. At the end of his first year went to Norwich and went to a museum which he was impressed by-at the end of his second year decided to write to museums for work and got a job as a paid volunteer in Bristol on an exhibition project and went back at the end of his third year thinking museums was where he wanted to work. After six weeks of work a job came up in the museum that had first inspired him in Norwich and he applied for it and got it. The folk life studies was a world view with a particularly celtic view-thinks a lot of it has become less relevant to people's lives. People want to get back to their roots and traditions-especially in Jersey. Second Record-Emmylou Harris, Dolores Keane and Mary Black performing The Grey Funnel Line. His life has been full of coincidences that led him to museums and Jersey. People were supportive in the museum profession. He was allowed to do displays, enquiries and tours as a student. At Norwich he started as Trainee Assistant in Social History and then he moved through the museum-he gradually moved towards things he was interested in like trade and industrial subjects. Museums and social history cover a great range of topics-has a breadth of experience. Became particularly interested in urban industrial history which he researched and lectured in-the 1970s was a period that was changing from the Industrial Age to the Post-Industrial Age-factories were being closed down at that time. Museums have changed in the past 20 years-has different ideas from when he started-thinks museums are now more directed towards the users. There are no limits on museums-just need an imagination. Was interested in the Caen Museum-he enjoyed it because it challenged him-there will be a need to connect to people in the future. There's a need to be educational but without being didactic. Has never been a great museum visitor-goes for a professional point of view-many don't appeal to him. In Norwich his career was progressing gradually-knew the city very well-had no desire to leave but his opportunities would have been limited if he had stayed. Was aware of the things happening in Ironbridge and he applied for the job and got it. He was a curator of Social History and manager of Blist's Hill Open Air Museum-a recreated late 19th century town. It was his first experience of management-it was very challenging and threatening-a difficult culture to work in. Third Record-Sylvia Sass singing an opera aria. Ironbridge was one of the most exciting times of his life professionally-built 8 new recreated buildings in his 3½ years working there including a bakery which is what his father did. His experience at Ironbridge will help him when dealing with Hamptonne. He got confidence from the project management training he undertook. Has had some training in management since Ironbridge. Is not very patient but has had to develop it. He is very enthusiastic in his work. Decided to move from Ironbridge to Jersey-was interested in setting up the organisation and a museum. Was interviewed for the job-expressed some concerns about the job and was forthright in his approach and got the job. Has no regrets now although the first year was difficult and frustrating. The new museum was due to have started being built before he arrived but it was caught up in a political debate and was delayed. In Jersey there is a pressure cooker atmosphere because it is a small place-he represented change and was seen as a threat. The people who were arranging the new arrangements between the Jersey Heritage Trust and the Société Jersiaise contributed greatly in solving the situation. There was an agreement meeting towards the end of 1987 at the end of his first year when it was agreed and if it hadn't been he would have left-gradually it started to be turned around. Is very proud for all the people that have helped that the Museum is running. Fourth Record-If I Had a Boat by Lyle Lovett. Sails in order to relax-sails competitively. Enjoys playing badminton and listening to music and likes to juggle. Has ambitions in his personal and professional life but is looking forward to the unexpected. Fifth Record-You Are Everything by REM.

Reference: R/07/B/16

Date: June 28th 1992 - June 28th 1992

Personal View of Gordon Young, feature writer for the Jersey Evening Post, interviewed by Geraldine des Forges. Was born and bred in Warwickshire in 1933 and got into a choir school at a cathedral. Went on to public school with a bursary-found it difficult because he wasn't allowed to talk to girls. He was thrown out of the school for talking to a girl on the street. Used to get into trouble at school-didn't enjoy academic work but enjoyed sport. There was no freedom in the school so he rebelled. He spent a lot of time singing at school. He played rugby and football and other sports. When he came to Jersey he joined the Jersey Rugby Football Club. He was 6 when the second world war broke out-remembers going through the Birmingham and Coventry blitz. He remembered enjoying the war-going into the woods and finding fragments of bullets-for him it was an adventure whilst his parents were terrified. In those days you were what your parents wanted you to be-they wanted to be a doctor. He started medical school at Birmingham University but gave it up after a year-didn't enjoy studying. He enjoyed the army and had a wonderful time for 5 years. First Record-Ella and Louis with A Foggy Day. Initially when he joined the army he applied to go in to the Gordon Highlanders but he was put in the Black Watch and was sent to Fort George-he liked the army discipline. He was picked out as an officer-went to train as an officer at Eaton Hall. He applied to join the Gurkhas but he was seconded to the King's African Rifles. He loved Africa-all his soldiers were Africans-they were wonderful. Then got sent out to Malaya. It was a tough life but for a bachelor the army was good because you could see the world. The companies he joined had great traditions-he liked the discipline because you knew what you could and couldn't do. He doesn't think national service should be brought back although it is a good experience. He never played the bagpipes as a member of the Black Watch. After he left the army he came to Jersey-he met a girl in England who was coming to Jersey and he followed her over and they got married at Trinity Church. There was very little work in Jersey at the time-he worked in a market garden which got into trouble because of a poor winter. He found another job at the hospital on the Observation Ward where he worked for a couple of years. At that point he heard of a building surveyors job which he got-he loved it and spent 27 years in the business-dealt with the Island Development Committee. Has never regretted not becoming a doctor. Second Record-Kai Winding. Surveying took a lot of training but he learnt by experience. You were never stuck in an office-he surveryed the whole of the Jersey Airport which took about 3 months and St Helier Harbour. Saw the poverty in St Helier-a lot of houses were in awful conditions and had people living inside of them. The buildings in the island have improved but there are still some appalling buildings. Loved the Noel and Porter Building but the British Home Stores building replaced it getting rid of all the beauty-King Street has lost some of its character. Loves buildings with Jersey granite-architects are now doing a good job. Hue Street was a beautiful street and he is glad it is finally being renovated. Loves railways-his father was a transport manager for a steel company. As a child he used to travel a great deal on the railways. Received a clockwork train set as a child and then as an adult bought a model railway and has been building it ever since. Third Record-Jersey Bounce. George Marshman, a cameraman from Channel Television, asked him if he wanted to be on television. He went for an interview with Ward Rutherford and he got the job-for 13 years he did freelance work for Channel Television and worked on every programme they produced. The broadcasts were all live so people saw your mistakes. He then worked for the Jersey Talking Magazine for the blind with Philip Gurdon which he really enjoyed and then Radio Lions with Alastair Layzell. For Radio Lions he did a minimum of five interviews in half an hour and everyone was very good. He thinks it's one of the best things that people can do for the hospital and broadcasters could gain experience from the job. He was keen to try something new and decided to move into journalism full time. His wife worked at the Jersey Evening Post and she told him that the 'Under the Clock' column needed a new author and he went for an interview with Mike Rumfitt and got the job. Loves writing and working at the Jersey Evening Post. He likes to comment on things that people are interested in. He thrives on deadlines and meeting people. He has written a book on rugby for the Jersey Rugby Club-they researched a great deal through the newspaper and it took 10 years to write. It's hard to write a book because it takes such a long time-he needed to take a break from writing but it has now been published. He'd like to write fictional books. He also enjoys painting and reading-he now writes art and book reviews for the newspaper. Fourth Record-Frank Sinatra with New York, New York. Enjoys family life-has had two sons and a daughter who have left the island. His eldest son works at the Jersey General Hospital but is going back to England, his second son works with computers and his daughter is a journalist. He has two grandchildren-Amy and Joshua. Started playing music 2 years ago-took up the trombone and has joined the Jersey Big Band where he plays the bass trombone. Fifth Record-Kid Ory with Oh Didn't he Ramble?.

Reference: R/07/B/19

Date: December 20th 1992 - December 20th 1992

Personal View of the Very Reverend Dean Seaford, Dean of Jersey, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. First Record-Brahms' Academic Festival Overture. He learnt to like music from the piece of music. Comes from a medical family-he broke the tradition. Went off to become an engineer. Decided he wanted something more to do with people. He used to go to church but it wasn't an important part of his life until he became an adult. In his mid 20s he went back to college. He studied at Durham University for 4 years. He was originally born in London but he went to boarding school so he didn't miss it. When you go to boarding school you have no base as your friends are in different places. He had to go through two selection processes to go on the course. The churches and the universities. The church's involve being promoted by a bishop and then you go to a selection conference. He started his life in the ministry in Enfield-it was a North London residential parish. The community was welcoming to he and his wife. You do a title for 3 or 4 years and then move on to a new parish with more responsibility and if you're lucky you become a vicar. At first it is easy to move about because you are prepared. His family were thrilled that he joined the church-his parents were very proud. At the end of his first title in 1971 he moved to Winchester to work as a curate and then took over at North Baddesley and High Cliff as a priest. It is difficult to leave friends behind from his parishes. He married whilst in Durham-it was unusual to get married whilst he was training-his wife had to get vetted by the bishop to see if she was suitable to be a clergy wife. In the past the clergy wife was often very involved in running the parish but it is less so in the modern world. When he started being a priest it was expected that his wife would take part in the community and his wife Helen did. You work from home and you are always working. Second Record-Michael Crawford with 'Love Changes Everything'. The queen appointed him as dean on the recommendation of the lieutenant governor-they wanted a parish priest from the Diocese of Winchester. He was involved in the administration of the diocese as a rural dean who looks after a cluster of parishes. He visited Jersey before accepting the post and thought the island was beautiful and met some nice people and it seemed a good idea to come. His role in the States of Jersey was explained before he came-he thinks the relationship is a good one. He thinks its a privilege being in the States and being involved in the Town Hall. In Jersey the church and community are closely linked and christians are in positions of power in the island. When he came to Jersey he was not good at French so it is a struggle speaking it. The role of a rector of a parish in Jersey is different than in England because of the special relationship with the constable and the parish and are involved in many committees by right. All official notices have to be put in the church box. The role of an anglican rector is unique because it is the established church-there are certain responsibilities in the parish regarding everyone within it involving burials and marriages. The parish system in Jersey is strong-people think that the Town hall are paying all of the costs for the church and so did give as much money as is needed. Third Record-Rachmaninov's Variations on a Theme of Paganini. The deanery takes up most of his time-it takes up a lot of time appointing new clergy-rectors can be with a parish for life. He has two sons in England who visit and a daughter in Jersey. Feels happy to be in St Helier-there is a tension between the roles of rector and dean. Is looking forward to spending the rest of his career in the island. Fourth Record-A Little Prayer by Evelyn Glennie.

Reference: R/07/B/22

Date: March 16th 1997 - March 16th 1997

Personal View of Vi Lort-Phillips, Jersey's lady of the camellias, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about her love of flowers-it came late in life. Lived in London as a child and was not born in Jersey but her maiden name, St Alban, has an Island connection. Born in London. Was in London in 1915-her uncle was the first officer VC. Met Rudolph Valentino as a teenager who kissed her hand. First Record-Mad Dogs and Englishmen by Noel Coward, who she met after going to the dentist and couldn't laugh at any of his jokes. Got married young after both her parent had died at 15 and 15-married a soldier from the Scots Guards. After they married he left the regiment and worked in London and she went travelling-was unusual. Decided to visit Russia with Primrose Harley a friend of hers-learnt russian. Used to be interested in sport-she was very interested in horses. Her husband got polio and was on sticks for a long time-had to give up shooting. She had a motor accident and her foot was crushed so she couldn't continue participating in sport. Second World War-During the Battle of Britain was playing croquet with polish pilots after they returned after their sweeps. Was an air raid warden-she resigned because she was afraid of the dark. Her husband worked in the War Office. Second Record-The Regimental March of the Scots Guards. Came to Jersey in the early 1950s-she didn't know she was going to come-her husband decided to buy a cottage in Jersey when a friend decided not to move there. Her husband had always wanted to live on an island. She sat for Augustus John who drew charcoal drawings of her-drew 12 drawings of her in 9 years-met many interesting people. Was fascinated by his fascination whenever he drew her. Bought La Colline in 1957 and the garden developed gradually. Her interest was triggered off by coming into a bit of money-decided to build a garden in memory of her brother Teddy St Alban who died whilst flying at the end of the war. Has some rare plants in the garden-when she went to Australia, Japan and America-joined the International Camellia Society-got a wonderful reception in Japan. Collected plants from around the world on her travels. Bred a flower called Magnolia Jersey Belle-was adjudged a hybrid. Third Record-Pastoral by Beethoven. President of the International Camellia Society-started in 1961/2 and has just over 1000 members from nearly all temperate zones. There are many kinds of different camellia-in China they use them for medicinal purposes in Japan they are grown as a crop for charcoal and in the west the main use is decoration. They can be flowering for six months of the year. You need to have acid soil for the flowers to grow. Has travelled with the International Camellia Society-had a conference in Jersey, visited Spain and Portugal. This year went with 40 to China for a conference-took 128 camellias to China and planted a Garden of Friendship. Fourth Record-Hole in the Road by Bernard Cribbens. Personal View of Phyllis Haines, headmistress of Helvetia House School. The school has always been run by her family-it was founded by her aunt, 16 years later her mother took it on and after the second world war she took it on. Her origins were mixed-her great great grandfather Etienne Joste on her mother's side came to Jersey in 1793 from Switzerland-set up a bakery and confectionary shop in Halkett Place and became naturalised-it cost 120 livres. He got married to a Jersey girl, Jeanne Le Bas, in 1795. Their grandson Captain Elias Joste bought the house for his elderly parents and educated his nieces, one of the nieces Eva Joste, started the school and her mother continued. Went to school at Helvetia but wasn't taught by her mother, later on went to courses in London and France. Later on specialised in maths with Mr Kellett from Victoria College. Always wanted to be a teacher-both sides of her family were teachers. Her mother and aunt were not trained as teachers. She didn't go to university-no grants. Went to England via the mailboat and went to London and later visited her father's family. First Record-'Love Is Meant to Make us Glad' from Merry England. Was brought in to teach at Helvetia when she was 21/22. The school has always done well. When her aunt started the school she had 5 pupils, before the war 80, after the war 40 and now 95-100. Used to be a secondary school but is now just a primary school. Social life-she loved dancing-used to enjoy dancing at the West Park Pavilion. Was involved in St Helier's Literary Society-flourished before the war-had Amy Johnson coming to speak to them. Before the war they were talking about getting Winston Churchill over to talk to them-would have cost £50. Involved in acting-inherited from her family-helped start a group called the Unnamed Players with Arthur Dethan and Keith Bell and others so that they could put on plays-the first one was 'The Importance of Being Earnest' at Victoria College and Pride and Prejudice for the Literary Society-both produced by Grace Pepin. It wasn't a very big club-about 10 people and stopped when the war started. Enjoyed travelling abroad-one to the Mediterranean and one to the north. Second Record-The Isle of Capri. Decided to stay in Jersey during the occupation-went out to the Jersey Airport and couldn't get an aeroplane and her mother was too old to go on the boat so stayed. Decided to keep the school open-got orders from the Germans that they had to teach German and joined together with St George's School to do so. Because of a lack of food sport was not allowed to be played in schools. She enjoyed the dances during the occupation. Drama flourished during the occupation-helped the population. She joined the Green Room Club during the war and joined the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club after the war. Every fortnight a performance was taking place and so she appeared a great many shows. She was involved in the Children's Benefit Fund-it came about because some money was made at school and she wanted it to help children and she got in touch with the hospital and they set up a fund under Arthur Halliwell to enable parents to buy rations for their children. Red cross parcels came in at an important time. Just before the war she'd taken part in a play at West Park Pavilion to raise money for the Red Cross International Society and she was glad that they had because later they saved people's lives. During the occupation the most dramatic change was the lack of radios and letters-despite the red cross messages. A lot of her friends were deported. Were aware when D-Day took place-entertainments were stopped but started again later but often the electricity used to fail and people ended up using lighters to light up the stage. Third Record-Rachmaninov's 'Prelude in C Sharp Minor'. End of Side One. Personal View of Diane Postlethwaite, clairvoyant, astrologer and fortune teller. Was taught from an early age to read tarot cards, hands and crystals. Learnt astrology later and she combines all of the disciplines. She was born with the gift and was not well at the age of 3½-became sensitive to people. Astrology is a science and an art and you need to be slightly clairvoyant to do it. Crystal ball-people hold the crystal and then you take them from them and pick up images from it. Tarot cards-you are given formulas for their use. First Record-All Things Bright and Beautiful. Was 3½ when she was told she had the gift-her mother found her in a church sitting up by the altar being very aware. Told her mother she would have a sister and she did. During the war years was separated from her mother and was taught to read tarot cards by a gypsy. Used to read her friend's fortunes. Went to a convent and the reverend mother caught her playing cards and called her 'a child of the devil'. Became a hairdresser but still told people's fortunes. Took it up as a career in her mid 30s-lived in India with her husband and learnt astrology, she met Mother Theresa in India and some Tibetan people who encouraged her to take it up as a career. She had had her eyes opened in India seeing the poverty and suffering that people suffered. Enjoyed her life in India. Second Record-Ravi Shankar. Went to England and Bermuda after leaving India-encountered voodoo which was frightening. Was going to move to South Africa but ended up coming to Jersey. Have been in Jersey for almost 10 years. Did some fortune telling at a Jersey Choir bazaar and her career took off from there. People are interested in fortune telling now-start of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. People looking for an answer-she is used as a crutch by some people. Learnt meditation to remove herself from other people's problems. Is a practicing Christian. When people come to have their fortunes read she starts with their astrology, then reads their hands. Uses tarot cards for general reading. Tries to help people who come to her with illness-their are many psychic healers in the island. Medicine and healing should be used together. People write to her for advice including people with business contracts. Replies to people by using clairvoyance. Third Record-Bob Newhart with 'The Driving Instructor'. Has been called in to use her clairvoyance to help solve crimes. In the 1600s she could have been burnt for being a witch-has experienced witchcraft in the island-goes to the church for help. Is against the use of ouija boards and witchcraft. Can see beyond what other people sees but can switch it off when she is with her family. Has seen things about her family and herself but does not look into them. Her family are tolerant and help her with her work. They can get annoyed with people who impose on them. Fourth Record-Cosmos. Gets involved in spirits in the house-believes a poltergeist is a magnetic force or the spirit of somebody who hasn't moved on-gets a priest out to help get rid of them. Has been to an exorcism. Spiritualism-can fell when people have died. Feels she is here to help people. The church doesn't agree with astrology but she believes in it. Fifth Record-Joyce Grenfell. During the summer visits a lot of Women's Institutes and take part in bazaars. One fete she was put down by a band. Has just bought a computer to help with her job-will programme people onto her computer. Astrology in the newspaper are very general and difficult to do because of different factors. Some people use their gifts to charge a lot of money but she doesn't believe in it. Her grandmother was psychic and so is her sister. Used to play golf and paint but doesn't get time to do them now. Would like to take up art again. She gets involved in her gift when she goes on holiday. Sixth Record-Chariots of Fire by Vangelis. Tells the future of Jersey for the year including predicting vandalism on the ferries to increase, the States of Jersey defence and fisheries will be discussed and we may have a tremor, oil off the coast will be found within two years, peace and environment groups activities will increase and drugs come under jurisdiction-bright year for the Island. Runs through the horoscopes for the year and the predictions for BBC Radio Jersey.

Reference: R/07/B/8

Personal View of Jeremy Mallinson, Director of the Jersey Zoo, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Lived in Jersey for almost 35 years-came over as a youngster with his parents. His father started a wine and spirits business-when he first left school he went into the wine and spirit business. When he came to Jersey he had started boarding school at King's, Canterbury-enjoyed his school life and holiday life. His father and brother was a cricketer-both members of the Jersey Island Cricket Club-his father was the organising match secretary for 12 years-took part in matches. Remembers Ronnie Postill writing an article complimenting him. Also played hockey and took part with boating with the cadet club at St Aubin's-was voted as cadet secretary. His father bought a 1906 cadillac car and he restored it-used to take part in the Battle of Flowers and St Aubin's Fete-it eventually went to America. Was always interested in animals as a child-used to take part in horse riding and took people's dogs for a walk. Wanted to go to Africa to see the animals. When he left school he went into his father's wine business but he was a bad salesman. Met a person on a cricket tour in Jersey who told him he was going to join the Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps-decided that he would join in order to see Africa. First Record-Music Maestro Please by Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. The Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps were a small body of trained men that were the regular army of the federation-provided the officers for the Army. His whole objective was to see as many animals as possible. Never can get Africa out of your system. Always had an enthusiasm about animals-was taught by friends in Lusaka. Saw Operation Noah [an operation to save as many animals as possible from an area that was being dammed] in action. Was not a military person-wanted to leave after 3 years although he had enjoyed himself. Was interested in joining the game department but wanted to come back to Jersey and he did in 1958. Second Record-As Time Goes By from Casablanca. Had not heard of Gerald Durrell until his brother gave him 'My Family and Other Animals' in Christmas 1958-was fascinated by the book. Heard Gerald Durrell was going to open a zoo and visited the zoo the second day it opened and wrote to the Superintendent of the Zoo, Kenneth Smith. He was interviewed and given a temporary job during the summer of 1959. He first met Gerald Durrell when he came back from Argentina with his collection on the 9th June 1959. Has gone the whole way through the ranks of the zoo-worked in the bird section for his first 18 months and then the mammals. Important to know what everybody does in a business-good to start at the bottom. The early days of the zoo were exciting and a struggle-had financial difficulty but Gerald Durrell wanted to stay in Jersey. Formed the Trust and gave all of his holdings to it and the proceeds of two books that he had yet to write. He was the founder and director but never got paid for that. Always been interested in primates all the way up to gorillas-his first love at the zoo was Npongo. When a film about gorillas was being shown he took Npongo and held her outside West's Cinema collecting for a mate for her. Third Record-Zambeze. Personal View of Ron Hickman, inventor of the workmate, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Born in South Africa and he was inventing from an early age. Remembers his first invention was a car that had a bridge over them so cars could travel on the same road. His family thought he was a bit made until he had his first burglar alarm that worked well at the age of 16. Was an outdoor person and he enjoyed music-playing the piano and violin. At 12 he became the local church organist. If he didn't become an inventor wanted to become an engineer. When he was 18 he qualified as an associate of the Trinity College of Music in London. Never got as far with the violin. First Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata in A Minor. When he left school he decided to go into the magistrate's office-moved around in different towns for 6 years-enjoyed the experience. Decided to come to England in order to pursue his desires to be come a car designer. When he first arrived in London he got a job in a music store and studied the organ part time. Talked his way into a job with Ford as a model maker-was rejected several times but eventually gave him a chance. Nine months later was promoted on to the drawing boards as a designer and he stayed with Ford for 3 years. Met Colin Chapman who had created the Lotus Car Company and was hired to help. Soon found himself as chief designer and stayed for 9 years. Got on well with Colin Chapman-respected you if you knew what you were doing. Owns a Lotus now. Bought a 1931 V16 Cadillac the previous year-drives around the Jersey roads in it. Second Record-Windmills Of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. Decided to leave Lotus Cars because of the responsibilities-decided to make a break from car design and tried to invent things. The first two inventions-one was a failure and the other was the workmate. His wife Helen backed him in his decision to leave his job. An inventor's working day is varied-have to have an idea, try it out-it gets a life of itself. Thought up the workmate because he was assembling a wardrobe and cut through a chair. There is a need to patent the invention or it becomes public property. The workmate was rejected by 7 British manufacturers and 3 American manufacturers. Black and Decker turned him down but came back to him 4 years later after he had put it into production himself. Had to put his money into it in order to put it into production. It took 6 years to start making money for him. Third Record-An Die Musik sung by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf. Decided to come to Jersey after he made licensing arrangements with Black and Decker-a nice environment to continue inventing in. Found it easy settling in Jersey-tried to run a Jersey company Techron but it lost money and now he runs it on his own. Is working on two major new inventions but are kept secret. He designed his own house in St Brelade-bought an old house with a good site and then designed his house with his wife and the architect. Have many inventions in the house-all for practical use. Created a fault reporting panel and an error took place without being reported-he discovered it was the fault reporting panel that had gone wrong. His most useful invention is a panel that tells him what doors and windows have been left open. Fourth Record-Morning in Cornwall by James Last. End of Side One. Personal View of Colonel Bill Hall, the Island Commissioner of Scouts who is about to retire, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. He was a scout as a boy-started in 1930. Had an older brother but he wasn't a scout. Joined at 13 and was very enthusiastic. He became involved with the troop after he left school-he was allowed to run the meetings-progressively wanted to start a troop. He persuaded his headmaster to let him run a troop in opposition to the school's troop run by the old boys. Has kept in touch with old boys from the troop. The troop was set up in 1937-he had joined the Territorial Army because he could tell war was coming. In 1938 the scouts were evacuated and when he went off to war the boys carried on running the scout group. Never thought of a career other than scouting-went to a stockbroker's office after finishing school. First Record-Colonel Bogie's March. Was an officer of the Royal Army Service Corps of the Army. Was a captain at the start of the war at the age of 22-was responsible for the supply of ammunition of the defences of the Thames. Later went into the Western Desert-was responsible for carrying ammunition in the second line. The Western Desert was a good place to fight the war-wide open spaces. Met General Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Later had a similar job in Western Europe-went to Malta for a while and later to France after D-Day. Second Record-The Slave's Chorus from Nabucco. After the war had ended-came out in the Spring of 1946-was given an office in Phillips and Drew and worked there for 25 years. Rejoined the Scouts and became a Commissioner in Camberwell and rejoined the Territorial Army. Got married in 1953. His role as a stockbroker was to advice people what to do with their money. Was involved in magistrate's court and the youth court in London-became a JP. In a court if a punishment is imprisonment they can challenge the decision in a higher court. Realised that deprived children often suffered from a lack of parental control. Third Record-Music recorded at a Greek jamboree. Has been on two jamborees-a jamboree in Greece was exciting-took on the task of a World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece-helped organise the camp, had good fun, Prince Constantine opened the Jamboree. Went to Corfu after the Jamboree. Personal View of Dr Anthony Essex-Cater, Jersey's Medical Officer of Health, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The role of Medical Officer of Health is looking at the community from a preventative point of view-establish the patterns and causes of diseases. The doctors don't come under his jurisdiction-their help is important to him in his work and vice versa. Medical Officers of Health are long established appointments-go back a 100 years-dropped the name in England in the 1970s reforms. Jersey decided to stick to the old title. Didn't always want to study medicine-his father was a writer and journalist but he also had an interest in medicine and decided to go into that area of work. He was at school during the war and had to make the decision whether to continue. Originally thought of going on a short service commission to Oxford and was interviewed by Wing Commander Cecil Wright who suggested to learn medicine. First Record-A Symphonic Study by Elgar. Was in London at the end of the war studying to be a doctor-was interested in sport, played a lot of rugby. Was a general course for training so didn't have to decide a speciality until later but was interested in paediatrics. Before he qualified he got married-his wife Jane was a student nurse at Charing Cross Hospital and because she married him she was forced to leave the hospital as it was not allowed. He went into the Royal Air Force Medical Branch for 18 months and was stationed in Wiltshire. When he left he got a job in a hospital in Bath. He joined up as part of his national service. His role at Bath was as a house officer and then he moved to London to a paediatric hospital. When he was in London he did a diploma in Child Health. Decided to move from child health to public health because of the lack of prospects in paediatrics. Got a public health job in Croydon. Needed to get further qualification-gained a scholarship for the London School of Hygiene at the University of London. Was there for a year and also studied occupational health. After that year had to refuse an opportunity to go to Harvard University. Second Record-Prelude No 1 by Villa Lobos. Left Croydon and went to Swansea where he was Deputy Medical Officer of Health-very pleasant place to live. His 3 children enjoyed living in Swansea-stayed for 5 years. He then moved to Birmingham in order to progress-began to lecture at the Children's Hospital in Birmingham about the health of children. Interest in anthropology-has been a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain for nearly 40 years. Has an interest in races-now medical anthropology is now recognised as an important discipline. Then moved to Manchester to become Deputy Medical Officer of Health-enjoyed the theatre of music of Manchester-the problems were similar to those in Birmingham. He was awarded a Council of Europe Medical Fellowship-gave him an opportunity to travel in Scandinavia to study their health system-looked at port health and child health. After Manchester went to Monmouthshire. He was only one of three Medical Officer of Health in a 90 year period. In 1974 took part in the reorganisation of the National Health Service-he was appointed a Member of the Steering Committee for Wales to work out the details of the reorganisation. Felt there was a failure by the government to listen to the steering committee. Fourth Record-Weber's Clarinet Quintet in B Flat Major

Reference: R/07/B/9

Date: 1983 - 1985

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