States of Jersey Departments, Probation and After Care Service. Sean Banks, Community Services Officer, in the Community Services vehicle.

Reference: p/03/b261/01

Date: October 15th 2000

Driving and Vehicle Standards Department, La Collette.

Reference: p/03/b417/08

Date: July 2nd 2000 - July 2nd 2000

Jersey Talking Magazine-November 1977 Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Pharmacy feature-Molly Perchard talking about cure and medicines for winter ailments. Gardening feature-Chris and David talking about flowers and vegetables and insect pests over the previous year. Poem about gardening. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about pickles, chutneys and sauces. Island Administrators-Graeme Pitman interviewing Senator John Riley, President of the Defence Committee about the functions of the Defence Committee, the responsibility for the police force and fire service, motor traffic and vehicles and the Immigration and Nationality Department. Tim with hints for the blind on warm gloves and the Braille Radio Times. End of Side One. Feature about the history of Victoria College on its 125th anniversary with Beth Lloyd and Di Weber. College choir singing the College Carmen. Derek Cotterill, the Head of Junior School at Victoria College talks about where the idea of a college in Jersey came from, the need and building of a college, the history of the school, headmasters, royal visits, effects of the german occupation on the school. Mr Devenport, headmaster, talking about his job at Victoria College, development at the school and the school as a public school. Frank Lewis, caretaker, talking about his 35 years at Victoria College, the occupation and changes with the pupils. Head boy Sacha Campbell talks about his duties. Robert Tilling, Head of Art, talking about Art in the College. Sacha Campbell talks about sport in the school including football, cricket, squash. A pupil talking about the Victorian magazine. Sacha Campbell talks about boarders at Victoria College House. A tour around Victoria College with descriptions of the buildings and the floral displays, produced by the Jersey Flower Club to decorate Victoria College for the anniversary, by June. Gordon Young tells a humorous story.

Reference: R/05/B/13

Date: October 31st 1977 - October 31st 1977

Jersey Talking Magazine-February Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Tim interviews Colin Powell, the Economic Adviser to the States, regarding the economic climate in Jersey in comparison with the UK, the sectors affected by the economic depression, how the rest of Europe is coping with the climate, the industries Jersey are famous for-tourism, finance, agriculture and light industry, the changing of the Jersey economy, the contribution of the wealthy immigrants, the steps taken to limit the affects of the recession, the relaxation of controls on immigration and the length of time this will take. Barry Jordan reciting 'Albert and the Lion' at the Jersey Opera House in aid of the Jersey Association of Youth and Friendship. Di Weber interviewing Ludevic Kennedy who was signing copies of his book called 'A Book of Railway Journeys' asking whether it was his first trip to Jersey, talking about trains and railways and his affection for them, train journeys in Britain, his favourite train journey and whether he has a train set at home. Horoscope feature-Diane Postlethwaite talking about the forecast for the year for aquarius. Father Piers Grant-Ferris, a man rescued when lost in the Andes, talking about the height of Mount Aconcagua, climbing mountains, the length of time it took him to climb Aconcagua, his climbing partner, the weather conditions, getting lost on the mountain, surviving once lost on the mountain, his feelings when he realised he was lost and the rescue operation. End of Side One. Gordon Young visiting Austria commenting whilst on the motorway, having their papers checked at the border, arriving at Schruns, describing the view of the mountains and the village. Di Weber visiting the new ambulance station with Mr Le Gresley talking about when they moved in, the hitches that they have experienced with the new building, dealing with a plane crash, why the decision was made to move from Midvale Road, the extension of the ambulance service, the difficulties in the old station, the duties carried out by the ambulance service, the shifts, response times, the possibility of an ambulance station in St Brelade, the sirens, talking to Mr Statt the assistant chief officer about the amount of ambulances they have, the equipment they carry in the vehicles, the crew on the vehicle and the training that they have, answering an emergency call, the training ambulance crews have to go through in order to qualify, what the men do when they are not answering emergency calls including cleaning the vehicles and in service training, female ambulance attendants, looking at a crash ambulance, describing the vehicle, looking at the equipment in the ambulance, the priorities of the ambulancemen when they arrive on the scene of an accident, looking in a transportation ambulance, describing the equipment inside, describing the control room, the amount of emergency calls each day. Colin Plummer, a reader, with a poem that he wrote read out by Gordon Young.

Reference: R/05/B/51

Date: January 31st 1981 - January 31st 1981

BBC Radio Jersey-Occupation Tapes. Told by the people who lived through it produced by Beth Lloyd. 1) Part 1: Preparing for the Inevitable. Alexander Coutanche talking about the surprise in the island when it was realised the island was not going to be defended and the evacuation was offered to the public. Eye witnesses talking about the panic of evacuation and the dilemma of whether to go or not, queuing to register, worry that the island was to be occupied, putting down of pets, Lord Coutanche being told to stay at his post and simplify the machinery of government, the potential blowing up of public utilities and the air raid on the island. 2) Part 2: The Germans Arrive. Eye witness accounts on seeing German planes flying low over the island and landing at the airport to begin the occupation, sending a message to the bailiff at the airport, meeting the germans for the first time, putting out white flags, demanding surrender, handing over the island, removal of the Union Jack from Fort Regent, BBC radio report on the start of the occupation, first impressions of the soldiers, germans buying food from the shops and the beginning of the paper war. 3) Part 3: Curbs on personal freedom. German orders being read out. Eye witnesses remember the losing of freedom, restrictions on vehicles, use of money paid for comandeered goods on essential supplies from France, orders against the use of coastal areas, changing side of the road to drive on, introduction and the experience of the curfew, life at the Evening Post, permits and other regulations. 4) Part 4: Food or the Lack of It. Poem on hunger. Eye witnesses talking about difficulty of lack of food and the improvisations with food, difficulty of feeding baby, difference between town and country people, suffering of women from malnutrition, children not knowing what food looked like, what people did to get by, food as subject of discussion, problem of lack of sugar and salt, use of potato flour, eating of seaweed, different methods of cooking and fuel, soup kitchens, bartering, farmers trying to get extra meat, getting extra eggs from chickens and keeping rabbits 5) Part 5: The wireless-Jersey's link with the outside world. Report by the BBC. Michael Ginns talking about eventual confiscation of radios. Eye witness accounts of v-signs at Rouge Bouillon, patrolling of district by islanders, confiscation and storage of radios, taking of radios from the parish hall, keeping of radios on threat of death, use of crystal radios sets, listening to the news, spreading of newsheets, the threat of being caught with radios and listening to tunes that had not been heard before the occupation 6) Part 6: Through the Eyes of a Child. Eye witness accounts of children and teenagers suffering a great deal, the fun children had, being hungry and cold, being without parents, relationships with german soldiers, schools continuing, difficulty of shortages of uniform, german lessons, soup kitchens, drilling on Victoria College playing fields, playing of sports, the Caerarean Tennis Club, riding on the german railway, mischief children got up to and scavenging for supplies.

Reference: R/06/2

Personal View of Derek Warwick, a motor car driver, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was born into a family who made agricultural trailers so he was always surrounded by vehicles. His father and uncle raced go karts-he started racing in Southampton at 12-he won the Southern Area Championship but they ran out of money at the end of the year. Started racing stock cars at 15. Was not very interested in school-it was always planned that he would go into his family business. Before he went motor racing he loved football and other sports-gradually motor racing took over for him-he was a big fan of Formula One. He was quite a good football player but not at a professional level. He was fortunate to find motor racing. Took part in stock car racing-you created the car yourself-he was very successful. He became Super Stock World Champion in 1973-it was a dream for him. First Record-Bert Comfort with 'Swinging Safari'. He first met his wife Rhonda stock car racing in 1971-he married in 1976 at the age of 21-she always supported him. They often are apart because of his work but it adds spice to the marriage. There is always a danger of accidents in motor racing but she has never been nervous about it. After 1973 having won the Stock Car World Championship he wanted a new challenge-he raced hot rods but didn't enjoy it as much. He started getting involved in circuit racing-in 1974 he went to Thruxton to watch Formula Ford and in 1975 he had his first season. In 1975 he was learning the circuits of the Formula Ford Championship. In 1976-he won the European Championship, was second in the British Championship and won some other Championships but also got married in January 1976 to avoid the racing season. Second Record-The Drifters with Under the Boardwalk. In 1977 and 1978 he raced Formula 3. In 1978 he won the Vandervelt Championship in the UK and Nelson Piquet was second and Nelson Piquet won the BP Championship and he was second. Nelson Piquet went to Formula 1 and he went to Formula 2 where he had a very bad year in 1979. In 1980 he was taken in to a professional team by BP-did the Formula 2 European Championship with Brian Henton and they came first and second. Was a stepping stone into Formula One-he stayed until 1983 in Formula 2 before moving into Formula 1. It was very difficult to make the money to work as a motor car driver-he struggled to survive. When BP agreed to sponsor him it was made much easier. A lot of drivers are wealthy and that is how they get the stepping stone-a lot of British drivers don't get to Formula 1 because they don't have the money. Formula 1 has changed-30 drivers are racing of which 15 shouldn't be driving-they're only racing because they have the finance. His family have always kept his feet on the ground. He started earning money in 1983 and then signed a big contract with Renault in 1984 and 1985 and that's when he moved to Jersey. He moved to Jersey because he had a financial package that he wanted to protect-he visited Guernsey but didn't like it and then he came to Jersey and fell in love with it and managed to move to the island. He tries to give to the community and helps charities-sometimes it can be difficult because he is so busy. Third Record-Simply Red with 'Something Got Me Started'. In 1986 he moved over to Sports Car Racing-he moved from Formula 1 because he had a bad year and couldn't get a drive and so he raced for Jaguar. In the middle of 1986 a friend of his was killed in Formula 1 and he took over his drive for the Brabham Team and then the year after he raced for Arrows. He has enjoyed his year with Peugeot but he wants to get back into Formula 1. He won Le Mans-he would like to get back into Formula 1 but it is going to be very difficult. He is winning the World Sports Car Championship-hopes it will bring him back to Formula 1. The ideal age for Formula 1 is 24-38-the reflexes do slow down at some point but he is yet to reach that point. He has never won a grand prix but hopes he still can. Fourth Record-Fleetwood Mac with 'The Chain'. He has experienced tragedy in motor racing-his brother Paul was killed-he had great ability in the car and was a great character. He still hasn't accepted his death-he still cries about it but he is trying to get on with his own life. It destroyed his family-he was the future. The day he was killed-was unforgettable-made him a much sadder person and doesn't worry so much what other people think. He has been outspoken about safety on the circuits since his brother's death-hopes this will save other people. He showed hs emotions to the fans at Le Mans-it was special to him because he dedicated it to Paul. Fifth Record-Elaine Paige with 'Memories'. Gets on well with the other racing drivers but it's still competitive-people like Ayrton Senna-you would like to be like him. Nigel Mansell is a great driver but he is embarassed for him out of the car because he doesn't come across well. He likes competition but not dangerous drivers on the circuit. The life of a racing driver can be very glamourous although he doesn't get involved in it because he's married-enjoys the life of a Formula 1 driver. Derek Warwick Honda and his golf company are his plans for the future. His daughters are involved with riding horses. Sixth Record-Tina Turner with 'Simply the Best'.

Reference: R/07/B/17

Date: August 16th 1992 - August 16th 1992

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

JEP Newscutting - Article regarding a 1943 Austin K2 Ambulance, registration number J2043 - August 2008.

Reference: US/502

Date: 2008 - 2008

Page build time: 0.0032774488131205 seconds