Travel Permits completed by people leaving Jersey on the 6th July 1917

Reference: D/S/M2/202

Date: July 6th 1917 - July 6th 1917

Photographs which relate to an outbreak of foot and mouth disease in Alderney, and feature the arrival of milk in churns from Guernsey on the Jersey Airlines de Havilland Heron aeroplane G-ANSZ, and photograph of Reg Thoumine, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Mr M Rick, States of Alderney Dairy Manager, and Pierre Blampied, States of Guernsey Veterinary Officer. Page number 9 of the Foot and Mouth in Alderney Subject of the Jersey Evening Post (JEP) Photographic Archive.

Reference: L/A/75/A2/FMA/9

Date: 1958-01 - 1958-01

Images of a vet from the Soviet Union being given a tour of Jersey Zoo by the zoo's Deputy Director, Jeremy Mallinson. The party visit several of the animals resident at the zoo, including some of the bird species, the Sulawesi Macaques, and one of the groups of Orang-utans. Jeremy Mallinson is present in images A to C (left), and in images D to H (second from left). The vet from the Soviet Union is thought to be present in images A to E (right), and in images F to G (left). [The vet's name is suggested to be Mr. Bhnnikor, but this cannot be confirmed at this time].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/2/4411

Date: July 7th 1977 - July 7th 1977

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1977/4411

Images of Oak Farm Veterinary Surgery, Le Hocq Lane, St Clement.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/4/1574A

Date: August 29th 1979 - August 29th 1979

Photographer: Gary Grimshaw

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1979/1574

Images of a member of the Junior Club helping out a vet and tending to animals on a farm on the island. These images were taken as part of a Junior Club 'We Can Fix It' feature. Jersey Evening Post

Reference: L/A/75/A3/5/2959

Date: February 2nd 1980 - February 2nd 1980

Photographer: Glenn Rankine

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1980/2959.

Images of a veterinarian at the animal shelter holding a group of 3 small cats.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/5/4517

Date: July 7th 1980 - July 7th 1980

Photographer: Peter Mourant

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1980/4517.

Images of veterinary nurses and a cat with a note in the photographer's diary mentioning Charles Gruchy for a careers supplement relating to a career in veterinary practice.

Reference: L/A/75/A3/5/5425B

Date: September 28th 1980 - September 28th 1980

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1980/5425B

Images of the waiting room at a vets in David Place with owners queuing up to have their dogs vaccinated against the dog diease parvo that had killed a number of pets in the Island [from JEP 14/10/1980 p 2].

Reference: L/A/75/A3/5/5560

Date: October 13th 1980 - October 13th 1980

JEP Photographic Job Number: 1980/5560

Images of veterinary nurses caring for a dog, and views of the Dogs' Hospital. The images relate to the opening of the Dogs' Hospital and a visit by Sir Robert Gower, Chairman of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) [see JWP 4/2/1939 p 1, 6 and 7]. The images were produced from the negatives depicted in Contact Sheet 5 of Red Contact File 12 from the Jersey Evening Post (JEP) Photographic Archive.

Reference: L/A/75/A4/12/CS5/3

Date: January 26th 1939 - February 4th 1939

Invoice from R J G Voisin, Veterinary Surgeon, Bath Villa, 5, David Place to the estate of the late Philippe Amy for professional attendance and medicine

Reference: L/C/112/B18/10

Date: July 17th 1902

Remedy for curing a sick horse

Reference: L/C/112/G1/51

Jersey Talking Magazine-November Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Phil and June Gurdon recording on the Solidor car ferry going to St Malo in France for their holiday including driving on to the ferry, having passports checked, parking the car, going up to the passenger areas, out on deck and describing the harbour. Health feature-Ian Caldwell, a skin specialist, talking about hair and balding. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins giving recipes for chutneys and pickles. Geoffrey Smith talking about hobbies for blind people. End of Side One. Beth Lloyd spending a day with a vet listening to him arranging his day over the radio, talking about the animals studied when qualifying, animals that he treats, the first call-treating a calf for worms, treating a cow for a leg injury, talking about the temperament of cows, cruelty on animals, treating a dog for an abscess, talking about the place of animals in modern society, treating a cat for eczema, treating a cow after it had given birth and an explanation of the treatment, seeing a cow with an infected teat, afternoon surgery, talking about the vaccine for cat flu, anaesthetic for dogs and cats, examining a sick dog and putting him down, talking about putting pets down, why he enjoys his job and whether his patients appreciate him.

Reference: R/05/B/25

Date: October 31st 1978 - October 31st 1978

Jersey Talking Magazine-February Edition. Introduction by Gordon Young. Beth Lloyd interviewing one of their readers, David Reynolds, asking him about how much he can see, his eyesight problems, losing his sight, dreaming with sighted memory, talks about helping set up a local branch of the British Diabetic Association and the Association's aims. Cooking feature-Margaret Jenkins talking about making punch. Guernsey feature-Linda Le Vasseur talking to a Guernsey resident-John Morris about 'All Creatures Great and Small' being made on his estate in North Yorkshire, the actors, being extras in the film, a funny incident, meeting James Heriot and the countryside where the film was shot. Sonia Hamon reciting a poem. End of Side One. June Gurdon taking a tour of Fort Regent with Director Peter Smith talking about the history of the fort, the development of the Fort as a sport and entertainment centre, looking at the rose gardens and the cannons, describing the aviary and the birds in the aviary, the old rifle ranges which are now fountains, the children's playground, the squash courts, table tennis rooms and archery and rifle ranges in the Gloucester Hall, skating, the piazza with shops, aquarium, museum and stage, an art gallery with an exhibition on and holding the States Collection, the swimming pools, a link being built from the swimming pool to the piazza and the escalators from the car park. Humorous story from Gordon Young.

Reference: R/05/B/28

Date: January 31st 1979 - January 31st 1979

Alfred Pierre Laurent, a social reformer and basket-maker, talks about his Norman father who was known as one of the finest workers in Jersey-there was only one other person who was up to his standard and workmanship of basket-making-Mr Le Cornu. He could do anything in basket-making. He was very quick tempered-once some six pences went missing-his younger brother had taken them. His father said he'd prefer to see his children dead than dishonest. Feared his father-he spoke French-his father wouldn't allow him to speak jèrriais. His father loved the British people but he wouldn't allow his children to speak jèrriais or english. He came from a large family-life was hard-his mother was a good cook and could make a good meal out very little. His mother was a breton and his father a Norman-it was unusual for the two to marry. He lived in town as a child-used to be drinking problems in town-used to charge 1d a pint. You had to make do when you were poor-he had his first cup of tea when he worked at Averty's the butcher when he was 9. A lot of children worked then-used to eat a lot of meat. In his spare time used to read second hand books and newspapers-spent all his money in book. Didn't enjoy school-some of the teachers were not very nice-children used to be beaten with a leather strap. Remembers the start of the soup kitchens in Victoria Street-a lady was making porridge in a tureen-remembers seeing Dean Falle who helped make the kitchens possible and thinking that he was God. In the age that he was brought up in there was more cruelty and interest in money-good people suffered and the richer people often took advantage. Today he thinks it has gone too far the other way-there is a lack of discipline. Ada Prouten [with a Jersey accent] lived in St Ouen all her life in later years at Ville Bagot where her husband farmed for many years. She was born Ada England 81 years ago when her father leased a farm at Vinchelez and she and her sister went to Les Landes School but she was expecting to do her bit on the farm when they got home each day. She used to pick potatoes in the summer and in the winter used to scrape the roots for the cows. On Saturdays they had extra work to do as nobody worked on Sundays. Life was hard for her mother-there were two days butter making a week, one wash day, a baking day on Friday. All the people her father employed ate at the same table as the family did. Had lunch at 9.30 in the fields, 12.30 had dinner and in the afternoon had coffee and cake in the field and at the end of the day had tea. In October her sister and her worked until 10 o'clock in the lofts. Her mother made jam, bread and cakes-never bought anything. Wash day-used to put the clothes to soak the day before, would boil water in a bath on a tripod, would then hang the clothes up. Hard work cleaning the house-there were no hoovers. Reused flour bags for various purposes including for pillow cases and aprons. Went to Les Landes School-enjoyed school-was always near the top of the class. When they were putting up St George's Church they were told not to go to the Church-she climbed up to the top of the church-she got in trouble with her teacher. Left school at 15 when the teacher was told a false story about her and when she didn't believe her she left school. Decided to help her father on the farm and used to go vraicing down at L'Etacq. Used to lease the farm-the lease was finished at 12 o'clock on christmas day-could be hard. Her sister and her were not paid-they had money when they wanted some and clothes when they wanted some. Her husband and her didn't have a very large farm. Had her first daughter a year after she was married but coped with it well-had to do your own work because you couldn't pay for anything else. She enjoyed her young life-people were friendlier in her childhood. Philip Le Troquer was born in 1896 at Le Pont, St Martin-when he was 4 his mother died-remembers being called to his mother's deathbed and her final words were 'carry on being a good boy'. Six years later his father died leaving 4 children under 10 as orphans-they went to Sacre Coeur Orphanage. His father died in April 1906 and he entered the orphanage as a 10 year old in May. He had a sister Selina and two brothers John and Frank. Life was nice but disciplined at Sacre Coeur-went to a church service first thing in the morning, had breakfast and went to school for 9 o'clock. Went to St Thomas' School-had their three meals at the orphanage. After school did his homework and cleaned the orphanage-had a rota for cleaning. The nuns were good to him. Had an uncle still alive-they were allowed out on their own once every quarter and they would go and visit him at that time. Used to visit his aunt in St Aubin once a year. Had to be back by 6 o'clock on the days they were allowed out. He left school at 13 and he decided he wanted to become a gardener. Used to have lessons from Mr Nouvel from Highlands College every night throughout the winter. Was always interested in gardening-Sacre Coeur Orphanage had a large garden. It was good training to become a gardener-trained for 4 winters. Received a certificate for finishing the course. When he finished training the first world war started-he was mobilised-was drafted to India and went through South Africa. There were about 20 boys from Jersey-stayed in India for 3-4 months then went through the Persian Gulf towards Turkey. When he returned he visited Reverend Le Grand and talked to him about his experiences-he was like a father to him. He has now worked 60 years as a gardener without a break. Enjoyed his time in the orphanage. Frank Noel [with a Jersey accent], 86 this year, has lived in Gorey all his life and is a plumber. His father worked on big racing cutters for Miles Kennedy. Frank did some work on TB Davis' yacht Westward. His father worked on the Southern Railway mailboats but they never moved from Gorey and he still lives in the same house as he moved to when he was 10 in 1908. Life in Gorey Village was quiet, some fishing took place. Gorey Pier was busy with sailing cutters but not as busy as today. Coal was brought in to Gorey by schooners for the Farmers Union that had a stall in Gorey. There was a windmill at Gorey to pump water for the train. As a child used to go to town on christmas eve as a treat and had Marett's sausages. Used to go on sunday school outings on horses and carts. Used to transport vraic using carts. After school and on Saturday he delivered beer for a shop in Gorey Village. Left school at 15 and went to Grandins to work as a plumber. He had wanted to go to sea but his father told him to learn a trade. Used his bicycle to get into work bought his mother. Joined up in the first world war-his parents were upset but proud. Landed back in Jersey on a Sunday morning-waited for the 1 o'clock train and when he got home it was one of the greatest days of his life. The first world war was frightening-not like the movies. Fought in the trenches and mountains-the worst was Belgium. Went back to Jersey on leave during the war-most of the boys in Gorey joined up. Loves low water and boat fishing-caught a 9lb lobster low water fishing and caught a conger of 40lb-it was hiding in a shipwreck. Professor Albert Messervy was a vet in Jersey for many years before, in 1953, he was invited to the chair of veterinary surgery at the University of Bristol. He was one of 6 children brought up in Trinity where his father was a farmer. He was 6 years old when the first world war broke out but he can remember the day. His brother and he were living at Stonewall, Mont au Prêtre with his Aunt Martha because his mother was seriously ill. They used to go to school in Trinity but on thought morning his Uncle George came in and said that war had been declared-he was horrified because their sunday school was due to have tea at Trinity Manor the next day but that had to be abandoned. Remembers in 1912 when the aircraft came from Dinard to Jersey in a race and was at West Park-remembers the pilot-on their way back to Trinity it started to thunder and lightning and somebody sheltering under a tree at Oaklands, St Saviour was killed when it collapsed on him. In 1915 they made some black butter-remembers the different kinds of apples added-in the evening a chimney caught fire-a photograph was taken which is now in Jersey Through the Lens. Was always interested in animals-especially horses. Fed ducklings foxgloves once not knowing that they were poisonous and when they died they got disciplined by their father-12 years later when he was studying to be a vet he was asked about in an examination about the effect of foxgloves on animals and he was able to answer fully. Also had a goat which had twins but she died choking on the afterbirth. The goats used to run into the house. During his childhood there was a fire at Trinity Manor-remembers horses pulling the fire engine to the manor. At the end of the first world war there was a Peace Fete which he managed to go to-his uncle bought fireworks from G D Laurens and Company-some of the fireworks didn't work properly. Jersey suffered little during the first world war-was some rationing of sugar and tea but it had no effect. After the war the farming community was hit-a depression took place and some people emigrated to find work. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Clarry Dupré who spent 24 years in the States of Jersey. Is retired but keeps the name jurat. Is enjoying his retirement. Was born in Jersey in 1914-had a happy childhood. Was born in Simon Place and at 6 years old he moved to Beresford Street where his father ran a fish and poultry business and lived there for the next 60 years. His father had 4 brothers and 1 sister but he only had one brother who he has worked with in the fish and poultry business for 40 years. He went to De La Salle College at 6 to 16 and then he spent a year in London learning about the fish and poultry business. After that he worked in Beresford Street from 17 to 24 until the time of the occupation when joined up with the army. He and his family are roman catholics. Played a lot of sport at school. Was the Jersey squash champion in 1938 and played for the Junior Muratti football in 1930 and 1931. First Record-Vera Lynn's 'We'll Meet Again'. When the second world war broke out he was 23/24-he evacuated from the island in June 1940 ad joined up as soon as he got into Weymouth. He was attached to the 11th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment-he went to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst from where he was commissioned to the Middle East with the Cheshire Regiment. Saw active service from Alamein to Tunisia, Egypt to Sicily for the D-Day landings in Sicily. Returned to England in 1943 ready for D-Day in Normandy. Went to Sandhurst for 7 months and left as a second lieutenant and he eventually became a major. He was awarded a military cross-felt he was in the right place in the right time. Was not married when he left the island-left his fiance in Jersey and they got married in July 1945. His brother joined up and spent 4 years of his service in Malta. After he got married in 1945 he signed back with the army for two years and was stationed in the Middle East at Palestine. When he came back his son was 10 months old. Second Record-Lily Marlene with 'The Girl Underneath the Lantern'. Came out of the army in 1947 and worked with his brother for 10 years until 1957 when he went into the States. Entered as a deputy in St Helier No 1 District-was elected unopposed but three years later came second in the election and went into the States-Terry Sowden was first. A year later he stood for senator in a by-election against Senator John Venables but lost and a year after that he stood for election for senator and topped the polls and was a senator for nine years before being re-elected for six years and then losing the election as senator but became a deputy in St Helier No 1 District again before not being re-elected and retiring from politics. After not being returned as a senator decided he would stand as a deputy and was elected as the President of Tourism making it 21 years. He was also Vice-President of the Defence Committee and Finance Committee. Follows the States on Radio Jersey-felt he was getting too old for the States. Believes people are still out there who could be politicians-wouldn't like to see party politics. Wouldn't like to see States members paid. Has served on the Tourism Committee for 24 years and as President for 21 years-it has increased massively in that time. He was elected on to the Executive of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association-saw over 20 different countries on conferences as a result. As President of the Tourism Committee was always a great supporter of the Battle of Flowers and when he retired he was made an honorary Vice-President of the Battle of Flowers' Association-hasn't missed a Battle of Flowers in 30 years. Used to go to Battersea Park and run an exhibit in the park. Third Record-Stuart Gillies with Amanda. Stuart Gillies spent many seasons in Jersey-is a character. When he retired from the States he became a jurat-had been out of the States for only 6 months and he was asked to fill a vacancy-he filled the vacancy for 4 years until he had to retire because of his age. You keep the title of jurat for the rest of your life. Jurats sits with the bailiff in the court-they are judges of fact-they decide on the sentences-they also sit on various boards-he sat on the Prison Board for 4 years. Didn't enjoy going to the prison but found it worthwhile. Jurats are responsible in the parish for elections. Attended the assize d'héritage and the swearing in of new jurats and advocates. Still goes to the honorary occasions such as the swearing in of new people but doesn't have the power of jurats anymore. Used to wear robes as a jurat and now hats are worn. Still worked in the fishmonger because it was early mornings-especially Friday and Saturday. The business was opened by his father in Beresford Street in 1921and he closed it 2 years after his brother died 4 years previously. His father died in 1924-when he was 10-his mother ran the business until he joined it. He has never done any fishing. Enjoyed meeting people in the business. Was a very small business-had 5 staff and 2 girls in the office-there was some competition with the fish market. They didn't do any wholesaling. Fourth Record-Pretty Woman by Roy Orbison. Has an understanding wife for 41 years of marriage-has one son and two granddaughters. Used to play squash until his 40s but didn't really have many hobbies. Feels he's been very lucky-doesn't regret anything. Fifth Record-Walking in the Air with Aled Jones.

Reference: R/07/B/13

Date: 1984 - 1987

Personal View of the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Talks to Quentin Bloxam, Zoo Project Director. There is a staff of 70 including everybody and there are thousands of animals. There are a wide range of skills that have to be catered for but the staff are well trained and take the pressure off you. Martin Syvret, groundsman, looks after 32 acres of grounds. You need a diverse range of skills to work there. An average day involves checking the grounds are clear, that the paths are walkable and then general gardening walk. He is laying a temporary path in front of the bear enclosure to give people a firmer footing. Doesn't enjoy clearing up after the public but enjoys developing the enclosures in the animal areas-growing rainforest plants in a Jersey winter is difficult. He has learnt a great deal since working in the zoo. First Record-Blur with Girls and Boys. Quentin Bloxam talks about the increase in size of the zoo but the philosophy is still the same. The zoo hasn't got commercialised-the family atmosphere has been maintained. Donna Preece, the junior reptile keeper, talks about the radiated tortoise-they come from Madagascar and enjoy the sun. They provide heating for tortoises so that they don't go into hibernation. The morning starts with the maintenance of the exhibition area, clearing up and when the public are let in the conservation projects are undertaken. A lot of time is spent observing the animals. They participate in special projects. She hasn't travelled yet but there have been trips to St Lucia and Madagascar. She has always been interested in animals and started volunteering in zoos from 13 and she has worked her way up the ladder until being offered a job in Jersey. She has been in Jersey for a year. Her favourite animals are the iguanas because they have their own individual characters. They try not to interfere with the animals and mimic nature as much as possible. Second Record-Peter And the Wolf. Mark Brayshaw, in charge of the marmoset rangers. Over the previous year that redeveloped the marmoset areas to increase their space so they are redeveloping another area this year. The marmosets use all of the space that is provided. They are allowed out in to the wood-they are checked 4 or 5 times a day and they are always fed at the same time of the day. When they're first let out they are observed. The breed in the woods-there was a birth of a black lion tamarin today. They try not to get involved in the process of the animals giving birth although a marmoset did have to have a caesarean section a couple of weeks previously. Not all of the marmosets have names but they have there own personalities. You can get attached to the marmosets and it is sad to see them go although it's for the greater good. He hasn't been involved in releasing any animals back into the wild but he hopes to in the future. He studied zoology and always wanted to work in a zoo. His favourite breed of animals that he looks after are the pied and black lion tamarins. Chris Dutton, a vet, has been at the Zoo for just over a year. He qualified in Bristol and worked in a normal veterinary practice but he got very interested in exotic animals at that time and subsequently worked in London Zoo for a year and after that he moved to Jersey. It is difficult changing from helping domestic to exotic animals-he tries to treat similar animals for example treating a snow leopard is comparable to treating a cat. He is still learning all the time-it makes it exciting and rewarding. Recently two gorillas were exported-the day of the movement was tense and he had to do the anaesthetic but it went well. The Jersey General Hospital staff provide help in their holiday times especially with the larger primates. He qualified at Bristol but when he qualified very little time was devoted to exotic animals but it is expanding now and people can specialise earlier. Most of the zoo work is preventative rather than emergencies-they are also involved in post mortems. They are involved in the breeding process-contraception is a major part of their work. Zoo work is a growing area of expertise for vets. Third Record-Rachmaninov. Second Part. Talking to Hilary French, the parrot keeper. She has worked in Jersey for 8½ years and she is from Somerset. Before she came to Jersey she worked at a wildlife rehabilitation centre in the West Country. She decided to come to Jersey Zoo because she had heard about Gerald Durrell. Her favourite part of the job is the breeding and working with a species that gets released back into the wild. The parrots of St Lucia were a great success-she has been out to St Lucia twice for field work. The birds that they breed at the zoo won't need to be released because the programme has been successful in St Lucia. She gets attached to the individual birds. She works with the St Lucian Parrots and the Thick Billed Parrot and her favourites are the St Lucians. They recognise her and new people. Her normal day is spent in the morning cleaning aviaries, servicing aviaries, checking the birds and preparing food. The afternoon is spent with another feeding round or maintenance work. In the summer because she works on the breeding programme she has to stay late in order to feed the chicks. Different chicks eat different food. The zoo look carefully they are feeding the various species the best diet that is nutritionally available. The birds are all endangered in the zoo. The birds can be very shy-it is difficult getting a balance between birds hiding and visitors wanting to see them. Fourth Record-Mozart's Magic Flute. Stella Norcup looking after the lemurs. Diet is important for the various animals-presentation has a lot to do with the diet. Insects are bred to feed insect eaters like the aye-aye and a lot is imported. She has stuffed larvae in a piece of bamboo because aye-ayes in the wild eat insects from wood and they try to replicate that in captivity. The long finger of the aye-aye is about one and a half times the length of its other fingers. She got interested in the work because she did a degree in environmental biology and then she volunteered and got a job at London Zoo and after finishing there cam to Jersey-about 15 months previously. There is a need for zoos for captive conservation and the educational side must be realised as well. Jersey has started a keeper scientist job which means some keepers get to go on field trips. Fruit is washed to get off the pesticides. A lot of fruit and vegetables are picked from the organic farm at the zoo. Lemurs are given fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, leaves and wood to eat. Bread and bananas are being fed to the bears. Hard boiled eggs are fed to the macaques. You have to know how much the animals move and eat and can't feed them too much of what they like. The future holds a lot of hard work, little pay but a lot of enjoyment-she hopes to take more field trips and improving animals lives in the zoo and learning more about animals. Fifth Record-Joni Mitchell with Big Yellow Taxi. Alan Gates, a man who used to work at the zoo. He sees a lot of improvements and an increase in size. He was originally on the bird section looking after the parrots. Remembers the cages of the primates. When he was at the zoo 27 years previously he didn't think it would grow so successfully. He is walking around and surprised at the different new complexes that have been built. Quentin Bloxam talking about the building of a new complex for the bears funded by Jersey Tourism. The building sites can look bad in the winter but he hopes that people come back to see the completed version in the summer. The paying visitors are vitally important for the continuation of the zoo. There is a conflict between conservation and putting on a show but ther're not mutually exclusive. You have to stimulate the animals as if they were in the wild and then they act naturally and interest people. The work at the zoo never finishes-they are always thinking of how to push the barriers back. He misses going on extensive field trips but he is very interested in staff development. Sixth Record-Chris Rea with Daytona.

Reference: R/07/B/25

Date: January 11th 1998 - January 18th 1998

Page build time: 0.020895135402679 seconds