Extended version of item R/03/A/1. Raoul Lempriere talking on St Helier Town Church and the Royal Square, includes; brief information on the age and apearences of the different parish churches; tombstones of Jean la Follay and Philip Durell Junior; royals who have worshipped in the church; layout and of the church; describes prominent features of the church, such as the font, altar, and organ; memorials, including those of Maximillian Norreys, Garthruda Amy, John Le Capelain, water colour artist, Michel Lempriere, Bailiff during the English civil war; Major Peirson (carved by John Bacon); mentions Roger Walden, a rector of St Helier who became Archbishop of Canterbuy in the 1300s; functions of the churchwardens; clock tower containing 2 bells; silver kept in the treasury and other valuables; possible origins of the church building; stained glass window of Christ blessing the children. Also mentions the St Helier hermitage and the death of St Helier; statue of St Helier in the church of Bréville(?) in Normandy; Battle of Jersey; grave of Baron de Rullecourt; describes the prominent features of the Royal Square, including the States Chamber, the statue of George II, the Royal Court house and the then Public Library; old French names of Church Street and Bond Street and naming of Mulcaster Street; office block containing the Church House opened by Dr Ramsey, Archbishop of Canterbury;

Reference: R/03/A/2

Date: 1970 - 1970

Mrs Becquet talks about her experiences as a farmer's wife during the occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 4. Includes: getting engaged at the beginning of the occupation; last minute decision not to evacuate to England; worries over what the German forces would do; resentment over the order to put white flags up and the hoisting of the swastika; death of her mother as a result of poor nutrition; sharing food with friends and relatives; almost being caught making butter in defiance of regulations; talks about rationing and using substitutes for various foods and tobacco; bartering for goods; trying to pretend that the occupying forces didn't exist; mentions collaborators and their fate after the occupation; discipline of German troops; faith that Britain would win the war; story about a French pilot who landed in Jersey having run out of petrol; various robberies from their farm; arrival of British troops on liberation day. Interview continued in item R/03/A/3a. Duration: 24 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/3

Date: 1970 - 1970

Alexander Coutanche talks of his duties as Bailiff during the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original Reference: Res 1. Includes: concerns that war was building during the years 1935-1939; Home Office committee dealing with the Channel Islands, presided over by Norman Brook; suspension of normal government and institution of the Superior Council; proclamations for the government of the island issued on the arrival of the German forces; mentions different German officers in command of the island; initial expectations of German officers that they would soon be moving on to an occupied England; mentions Mr Prime, his interpreter; daily duties in dealing with the correspondence from the occupying forces; creation of the German field command at Victoria College House, and headquarters for the occupying forces in all the Channel Islands at Roseville Street; regular council meetings; protesting about things he objected to; setting up the Bailiff's News Office to deal with correspondence sent through the Red Cross; changes in island agriculture to become self-sufficient; supplies from France and requisition of cars to pay for this; Summerland knitwear factory set up to provide clothing; effects of D-Day; changes in the German chain of command; relief of the Red Cross ship Vega; deportations; meeting with German commanding officers immediately prior to liberation; surrender of the German forces on the HMS Beagle, and liberation; difficulties of getting the island back on its feet after the war. Recorded in 1971 by Sheila Sibson. Duration 43 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/5

Date: 1971 - 1971

The Reverend Peter Manton talks about the hurricane of 02/11/1967. Includes: weather conditions; barometer readings; tides and flooding; damage occurring to property all around the coast; lack of sea defences; destruction of the Garden Cave at Plémont; mentions buildings on reclaimed land. Duration: 5 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/4

Date: 1970 - 1970

Bob Le Sueur talks about his experience of the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 2. Includes: initial feeling that Jersey was isolated from the war, tourists visiting etc; panic when it was realised that Jersey would be attacked; going to the Royal Square to hear the Bailiff's announcement of the Island's surrender; anticipation of the Germans' arrival and fears that they would ransack the Island; surprise at the disciplined behaviour of the occupying forces; shock at arrival of the first slave workers; reading notice in the Evening Post of imminent deportations; thoughts on suffering and patriotism; atmosphere and behaviour of people on the day of the deportations; mixing with Spanish slave workers; story about José, a slave worker, and his adopted son; treatment of the slave workers; feeling among the population that the island authorities were collaborating; rise of the Jersey Democratic Movement; feeling of living in a vacum and living day by day; thoughts and feelings on the liberation; discusses entertainment, plays put on at the Opera House, parties held; friends who sheltered 'Bill' [Feodor Burryi], a Russian slave worker, at a flat in Grosvenor Street; mentions women who had relationships with German Officers; treatment of Russian prisoners of war by their own government; mentions Gestapo headquartes at 'Silvertide', Havre des Pas and Mr Wolff, head of local Gestapo branch. Recorded by Sheila Sibson in 1971. Duration: 44 minutes.

Reference: R/03/A/6

Date: 1971 - 1971

Miss Constance Brown MBE talks about her experience of the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 3. Includes: running a café at St Brelade's Bay with her mother; chatting with German airforce personnel and other troops; food shortages, customers having to bring their own milk and sugar; Austrian troops who came to Jersey later in the war; a gun emplacement which was built next to her house; anecdote about Douglas Tanguy, a bandleader; a house, 'Mimosa', which her and her mother used to let and was comandeered for the use of medical personnel; construction of the sea wall by Russian slave workers; mentions 4 teachers who had been staying at the Biarritz hotel for a summer holiday, Winnie and Jessie Young, Eve Payn and Dora Hocquard; story about trying to rescue a drowned man; refutes the rumor that dead slave workers were buried inside the sea wall; anecdote about an American airman who was shot down over Beauport; disapproval of local women who fraternized with German troops and of collaboration in general; mentions looting of houses by local people; liberation and hoisting the Union Jack on VE day; being given spare wood for fuel by the Germans building the gun emplacement.

Reference: R/03/A/7

Date: 1971 - 1971

Mrs Le Cornu talks about her experience as a farmer's wife during the occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 5. Also contains another, unidentified woman speaking. Includes: food substitutes and methods of cooking, including porridge, cake and tea; people helping to harvest wheat and gleaning some to make flour for themselves; making and hiding crystal radio sets; temptation for local girls to fraternize with troops; arrival of German forces, aerolanes swooping low over houses; confiscation of wireless sets; leaflet circulated stating that this was illegal under international conventions and taking of hostages in reprisal for the leaflet, including her husband Philip; feelings of uncertainty about what the occupying forces would do; some farmers were ordered to grow food for the Germans, feelings that some people got rich by doing this; various shortages and hardships mentioned; fowls being stolen from the farm one Christmas eve; hiding undeclared animals from the Germans; distilling Cognac from cheap red wine. Sound quality slightly muffled.

Reference: R/03/A/8

Date: 1971 - 1971

Mrs Perkins talks about her experiences of the German occupation. Recording originally produced by the Channel Islands Educational Broadcasting Service. Original reference: Res 6. Aged 10 at the beginning of the occupation. Includes: earliest memories of the occupation; mother worked on a farm at Grouville, aunt at an estate agent's in Hill Street, which later became a second-hand shop; mother decided against evacuating; recalls the Islands being bombed, saw the bombers flying overhead; remembers German troops marching down the streets singing; notes the changes in ages of German troops as the war went on; accustomizing to the occupation, German lessons in schools, curfew etc; says that Germans used Jersey as a kind of holiday resort where troops were sent to recuperate between campaigns; shortage of money, making calenders and paintings etc to sell; using food substitutes and other shortages; the black market and bartering; amateur entertainments put on; concert parties put on by the Germans at the Forum, including propaganda films; effects of the deportations; arrival of slave workers, who were held in camps; helping escaped Russian prisoners (Mrs Perkins' mother and Aunt were both Russian), including Mikhail Krohin and George Koslov; Dr McKinstry, the Medical Officer of Health, helped many people by providing false ID cards etc; Mrs Perkins' mother and aunt being imprisoned around D-Day for being Russian-born; some people making large ammounts of money selling food; mentions the SS Vega; Liberation, feelings of gladness but also uncertainty for the future; remembers women who had fraternized with the Germans being victimized.

Reference: R/03/A/9

Date: 1971 - 1971

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