States of Jersey

Reference: R/07/D

Programmes

Reference: R/07/H

Sport

Reference: R/07/C

Music

Reference: R/07/E

Events

Reference: R/07/G

Personal View of Florence Bechelet [with jersey accent] interviewed by Beth Lloyd talking to her about the Battle of Flowers. She has been making floats since 1934, she decided to start when she saw a float in 1928, noticed a carnival class was being held-decided she wanted to take part in it, she made a watering can costume and showed it to a neighbour who said that she'd done very well, was going to walk in with it but it would have been too heavy. At 15 she found an old pram, which she tied with string planks and put a tower shaped clock and vases with flowers on it. With two friends she went to the Battle Of Flowers at Springfield and won 3rd Class in the class with 10 shillings prize money. She was determined to do better next time. She was not artistic at school, she put the floats together by looking at picture of animals to get ideas and cutting a piece of wire bigger than the animal and shaping it. For the first 3 years she made it with hydrangeas. She found out there was a prize for best exhibit in junior class and senior in wild flowers. In 1937 she made a weather house in heather and won first in her class and the junior wild flowers prize, which was 6 solid silver tea spoons. First record-a March from the Band of the Welsh Guards. Battle Of Flowers at Springfield was a smaller scale than today but had beautiful floats. They used a lot more hydrangeas in those days. There was more of a team effort in the past, young people used to put together exhibits, most young people were in the Battle. Springfield-used to hold up to 10,000 people who were mostly islanders but there were a few tourists. Local bands used to play. The outbreak of war stopped the Battle Of Flowers. Her family had a farm but they couldn't export produce and cattle kept being taken by the germans. They were left with 2 cattle, a severely depleted stock, in St Ouen. The Germans took 12 vergees of land in Les Landes. She didn't really deal with the Germans. Food was scarce-a lot of people were saved by the Red Cross parcels. She had planned for the Battle Of Flowers before the outbreak of war but didn't do it until 1951. It was a hunting scene, which won first prize in its class with a prize of £15, first in the junior wild flowers which was a prize of a silver tea set, the prix de merit, which was a prize of a refrigerator which still works today and the best exhibit of the whole show by an individual, which was a prize of a radiogram worth 160 guineas. Second record-Sound of Music. Battle Of Flowers started again in 1951 and went to Victoria Avenue which was a better venue and had a smooth road. She didn't know why it changed back as it started on Victoria Avenue. There hasn't been a Battle at the end of the Battle of Flowers for 7 or 8 years. At the end of the parade she used to have to protect her own float. She has started a Battle Of Flowers Museum through her interest in the event, it has proved popular after the first three years of difficulty. It was opened on 16th June 1971 with one building and then a second, third and fourth with sixteen models from the Battle Of Flowers in total. She has made 40 exhibits for the Battle Of Flowers and 13 exhibits for other fetes including on Grouville Common, St Ouen's Fete, Villa Millbrook and St Andrew's Park-in competition. Her favourite float was made for the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh's visit in 1979 with an exhibit of 40 flamingos, took it to Howard Davis Park and were introduced and talked to the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh who were easy to talk to. The President of the Battle Of Flowers' Association gave her permission to show it before the Battle Of Flowers took place and she used it in the Battle Of Flowers that year although it didn't win a prize and the Association said they couldn't give her a guarantee for it because it had been shown before but it was sorted out although she was upset and didn't exhibit for the next 2 years. Had an exhibit that became a design for a stamp, which was a float of ostriches. She later became allergic to glue. Told by Philatelic Bureau that her design was being used as a stamp-1s 9d. Third Record-Blue Danube. She makes a float by getting a book on animals, making a scene, for example, a jaguar with llamas, keeps the design in her head rather than drawing it, no help given to her-all individual work. She picks the grasses as soon as they're ready. Used to pick them at the sand dunes and now grows her own. Has to sew them each year. She makes her mind up on what the theme will be on christmas day and doesn't change her mind. The float is made from three quarter inch mesh chicken wire. On a horse and bison float-84,000 pieces of grass were used on each horse and 11,000 bunches of approx 20 each on the bison. All her spare time is spent doing things. She is not normally a patient person but enjoys doing it and never gets bored. She dyes the grasses before putting them on the float in a bucket on her gas cooker. Prefers making animals to human figures. She was especially careful when making a Jersey calf figure as she was asked to do so by the Société Jersiaise and she wanted to make sure it was right and kept checking. Fourth Record-Jimmy Shand-chose it because it has a good rhythm. She talks about her exhibits that went to Exeter for Jersey Tourism and Leeds. She went with them and got a good reaction from people as there is nothing like it in England. She went to Guernsey with the Pied Piper of Hamlyn and got first prize. Brought humour into her exhibit, the funniest was a donkey derby. The Battle Of Flowers is not as good as it used to be-early 50s used to be 80 or 90 exhibits-a lot more than today. The young people not interested. The parochial classes not as popular as they can't find a leader. Miss Battle of Flowers is a good idea and provides an extra exhibit. Visitors still very keen. New set up with the arch ways on the Victoria Avenue good. Pictures hanging in museum. Fifth Record-Mary Poppins-Chimchiminy. Went to the ball at the West Park Pavilion as a chicken and won first prize and the tortoise and the hare but she collapsed due to lack of air in the costume. She was unable to compete in the Battle Of Flowers this year because she has been in hospital, told to rest but she has an idea for next years float already. End of Side One. Personal View of Major John Riley. Born in Trinity Manor in 1925. His grandfather came to Jersey in 1908. His ancestry is from Yorkshire and later his grandfather moved to Cornwall and London and came to Jersey in 1908. He had an interest in islands and tried to buy Sark and move to Alderney but moved to Jersey. He was interested in architecture, by profession a theologian but had a love of architecture and took time and money rebuilding the manor which was near derelict when he moved in. The roof had to come off and it was reconstructed in a French style. The architect was Sir Reginald Bloomfield, a London architect. The manor goes back to 1550. It was the seat of the de Carteret family and was successfully restored and enlarged by de Carterets in 1660 and the 19th century. First memories of the manor were of his grandfather who was an imposing and a great church man-morning and evening prayers were in the chapel and many people lived there including 3 uncles and his father but mother died in an accident in 1928 but he had a largely happy childhood. In the 1930s he travelled around England as his father was in the army. It was a contrast to living in manor but it only struck him as odd later in life. Being brought up in a large house was not restrictive, the children had good fun and he had affection for certain parts of house. First Record-Carmen Jones. Schooling-he went to day school in Jersey, preparatory school in England and then school in Winchester when war broke out in 1939. He didn't enjoy school, he was not academic and not good at ball games but it was a good education. During World War 2 his grandfather was allowed to live in the Manor for the first 2 years, the grounds were used as an ammunition dump, later the garrison moved into the house and his grandfather moved to one of the lodges. House undamaged and well looked after. When he arrived back in the island day after the liberation the germans were cleaning the manor. Felt worried about being separated from the island and the only contact was red cross letters which were only 28 words long-had to be careful. Was registered by mistake as an enemy alien card in England. Ambitions-had it not been for World War 2 he may have had an academic career-unsure. Couldn't think of any other profession he would have done apart from the army. His grandfather wanted him to have a classical education, he was an academic man and had stood for parliament but didn't get in. Ended up in the Coldstream Guards-his father had been a member, he has no regrets as he lived with marvellous people. He joined in 1943 and was commissioned in 1944 and joined the forces in North West Europe as a platoon commander. He wasn't frightened of getting killed, the idea of coming home as a wounded war hero appealed, but he had a fear of being frightened. In general the sergeant runs the platoon as they have massive experience and the officers, who had more training, did the planning. He went to North West Germany and saw action for 9 days before he was wounded on 9th March 1945 and evacuated to a hospital in Nottingham 48 hours after. It was the last he saw of the second world war. After he went out to Palestine. They had been earmarked to go to Japan but the bomb was dropped before he had to go. Second Record-Underneath the Arches. He stayed in army for 20 years, working with nice people who trust in each other. He was in a brigade of guards and had a really varied time. Later he was involved in the administration of the army. When he was in the Coldstream Guards he talks about how they felt in full uniform, being very hot whilst on parade, standing still was tiring, he took part in the vigil when the king died. He served in Palestine between 1945-48, then back for 3 months then went out to Malaya for 2½ years which was exciting. As company commander he led a patrol of 14-20 men for a week-10 days in the jungle. His father was still in Jersey at this time and became a jurat in the Royal Court. He came back on leave from time to time. The Manor was not in working order till the mid 50s. When he came back he helped around the Manor. In his army career he became an instructor-dealing with officers in their early 30s who were destined for commanding positions. During the Seven Day War there was both an Israeli and Egyptian who were called back into service. Third Record-Glen Miller. Took the Coldstream Guards Band to America in 1954-for 12 weeks. 160 men would move into a hotel, play a concert, have dinner, go to bed and then move around-strenuous. He left the army in 1963, he was sad to leave but had two young children, schooling was a problem for serving officers. He came back to Trinity Manor, didn't know what he wanted to do, determined to find plenty to do. He took the dairy farm back and got involved in companies and then stood for the States. He decided to go in to politics because he felt he had a responsibility to the island and wanted to give something back. His experience outside of the island was of value. He had no ambitions as a politician-the States was more like local administration. Fourth Record-Noel Coward. Politicians work hard-especially becoming president of a major committee which holds almost a ministerial responsibility, you need to be able to communicate with people. Life going to become more difficult for people in politics. You could run the island with 20 people but would have to pay them, which is against what the island politics is about. Became President of the Defence Committee-linked to his background. Wilfred Krichefski asked him to join the committee and he was able to help because of his military background. It was not like the Ministry of Defence-more like a Committee of Public Safety. Decided to finish in politics last year as he had done 18 years and didn't want to go stale and stand in the way of other people. He wanted to clear the way for other people to be promoted and hopes people don't stay on too long. He has been able to develop Trinity Manor for people to have seminars as he has moved himself in to one end of the house and through this he meets interesting people through the functions and it keeps the Manor occupied. For relaxation he goes sailing during the summer and rides horses in the winter.

Reference: R/07/B/1

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Bill Perchard interview by Beth Lloyd. Talking about how the celebrations of Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society last week went, only a bunch of farmers-amazed it went so well-every did their job and there was no bickering and for the two days it was a grand reunion of country folk. The visitors didn't come and so the money wasn't great. Would change a few things if doing it again-would give out less free passes. Worth losing money on it because it did well for the agricultural and horticultural industry. Brought together the agricultural associations. Cattle show-exciting-more entries as usual. Sponsors for the shows-inter-parochial competitions-done 50 years ago-only one parish missing. Mr Cowdrey-the queen's manager and an australian-judging competition. Australian and New Zealand breeder comes to Jersey a lot. No thoughts about having an annual event-possibility of contributing if there was a carnival week with the Battle of Flowers. First Record-Judy Collins and Amazing Grace and his reasons for choosing his song. Went to church and sunday school as a child-had nowhere else to go-met girlfriends at church-social and religious life. Not born in Jersey-parents went to Canada for 6 or 7 years-came back to farm at St Saviour's. Remembers Canada-when he was 2½ years old, remembers meeting cattle for the first time. Always wanted to be a farmer-when he left school learned a trade-worked as a builder-eldest of 14 children. Horn Brothers-in Winchester Street for 10 years-worked as builders labourer-became an apprentice. Bought a motorbike at 17 and took his bosses daughter out and she is now his wife-went out for 6 years before they got married-got married when she was 22. When working for the firm didn't have to help on the farm. Then had dinner at his bosses house-living at Peacock Farm in Trinity. Second Record-Heykens Serenade. Got married at age of 24-felt like a long wait, his father in law bought a house in Victoria Street and they were allowed the top flat-after a year he wanted the country. He wanted to farm-La Chasse-decided to let the farm-father acted as guarantor-that was july-moved in at Christmas. Shock to Winn-who was a town girl-within a month she was looking after the farm. Had a thousand hens-Marion born 3 years later-then did more in the house and then got help in the house and helped outside. 1939-had a dozen animals-WW2 came-no exports-one good thing-had to supply an animal for slaughter-sent the worst cow-after a while had all nice ones in the stable-bought cows in order to provide them for the Germans. Had a decent herd by the end of the war-bought a cow called Keeper's Lass-built up on these during the war-after the war did well. Problem of occupation-fear-could have been deported-no direct orders-told civilian authorities-in trouble if didn't do as you were told. Always said yes and then tried it on afterwards. Spoke a lot of Jersey Norman French-if there were Germans within earshot didn't know what they were talking about-only one of his siblings that could speak Jersey french to his parents. When he first got back from Canada-went to a private school at Five Oaks-he was the only one who couldn't speak Jersey french-learnt it by being with the boys. Later in life-now all in English-thinks it is a dying language. Third Record-Edelweiss in the Sound of Music. Just celebrated his golden wedding anniversary-four children-Marion, Colin, Robin and Rosemary. Three of them interested in farming-Colin never liked the farm-disliked it from 5-didn't enjoy getting the cows in-didn't want the farm-wanted to go to university-went to Liverpool-gave him the money and invested it-graduated and went to work for the British Council-learned Spanish and went to Spain and then went to Uganda, Malawi and then came back to England, India-got married and ill having gone to Bangladesh, South Korea-set up a council. After 3 years went back to London and now is in Zimbabwe. Different from generations of farming in Jersey. After farming for 3 years-landlord said he was thinking of selling the farm-told Mr Whitel he couldn't afford it-put it up for auction-man from Rozel said he'd buy the farm and Mr Perchard could remain as tenant and he put in electricity. Two years later evacuated-came back in 1946-going to sell the farms-only had a small bit of money-bought the two farms for £1400 with rentes. Robin Perchard-interested in farming-used to help his father-natural farmer. Given up cattle and outside farming-Robin looks after it. Fourth Record-Gracie Fields. First got involved in the RJAHS at christmas 1934-49 years-back for the centenary-went to see the show-interested when he took the farm. After WW2-Carlyle Le Gallais suggested going on the council. Became a committee member for St Martin's Agricultural Society and got in to RJAHS. Went into the States-gave up RJAHS council member-when out of States became vice-president. Enjoyed the States work for 6 years but the second 6 years was hard-was becoming a full time job-good to go back to his farmer friends-became president 6 years ago-finishing at christmas. The society-more important than ever-decided not to import semen-have to handle it right. Danger from outside-don't want open market for cattle outside of island. Fifth Record-Harry Secombe-The Old Ragged Cross and the reason that he chose it. End of Side One. Personal View of Jurat Peter Baker, Constable of St Helier. Seeing himself as a St Helier man. His early days-spent time at the Jersey Swimming Club-had a lot of fun at Havre des Pas Swimming Pool. Outdoor child. Interest in boats-from his mother's side-from the Isles of Scilly. Didn't enjoy going to school-Victoria College-not happiest days of his life. Ambition-to get out and enjoy himself-thought he may be able to go to sea professionally-changed his mind. Went to London at 16-worked at Harrods. First Record-1812 Overture by Tchaikovsky. Whether he plays an instrument, listening to music. His family owned a shop in Queen Street-Frederick Baker and Sons Limited. Harrods ran a student scheme. Joined the armed forces during the second world war and became a major by the end of the war. Joined the Territorial Army whilst in London-went into France in 1939 with the British Expeditionary Force-saw service in Dunkirk, in Northern Ireland and then Africa, Sicily, Italy, South France, Greece and finished career in Palestine. Palestine furthest east he went. Enjoyed being a parachutist-big impact on him-development of spirit in an emergency. Left army and returned to Jersey after liberation. Jersey changed after occupation-exciting atmosphere. Settled down and joined the family business. Honour of being voted Constable of St Helier-always interested in the honorary system-good to put something back. Elected to Welfare Board and then Constable. Second Record-music from Dr Zhivago. Used to be a filmgoer but with television stopped going to the cinema. Cinemas after the war-West's, Forum and New Era at Georgetown. Went straight to Constable in St Helier-not unusual in St Helier-like to vote for businessmen in St Helier-different to country parish. Excess of £3 million in budget-more than all other parishes-being constable of St Helier like running a small business. Spends more time being the Constable of St Helier than running his business-more than a full time job. Family business-sold out, now where Queen's House stands. Family owned Noel & Porter's where British Home Stores now is-that was sold out. President of Chamber of Commerce for 5 years, St Helier Welfare Board, Secretary of Jersey Lifeboat. Lifeboat-secretary virtually runs the boat-doesn't go out on operations-used to launch the boat and call the crew. Now run by the Harbour Office. St Helier Welfare Board-major part of budget of St Helier parish-concerned with individuals-good system in place-some people very difficult to help. Meet as the St Helier Welfare Board once a month-has to decide what to do in difficult situations. Third Record-Oriental Trinidad Steel Band with Jamaica Farewell. Likes hot but not humid climates. Enjoys travelling-visits friends in America. Life as Constable-office as Constable unique-look to Constable to variety of things-Constable not as political as deputy or senator-other duties. No political ambitions beyond Constable of St Helier-would not stand as senator. States work, civic duties and the parochial duties such as welfare that takes up most of his time. Concern about violence in St Helier-believes it may be exaggerated. Relationship between States and Honorary Police good-system difficult but works well in island like Jersey. Important future for honorary police. Fourth Record-Evening Hymn and Last Post by the Royal Military School of Music. Used to sail but doesn't race anymore-good way to learn to sail. Enjoys people, good food and wine and life. His wife and he swims in the sea everyday-good start to the day in the winter-used to swim for the island and Victoria College but now bathes rather than swims-took part in the Jersey Swimarathon. Describes a typical day. Fifth Record-Peter Dawson with Friend of Mine. Is going to decide whether to carry on as Constable of St Helier

Reference: R/07/B/2

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Leslie Sinel, former Jersey Evening Post employee and occupation historian. Born in St Helier in 1906. Involved with people around you-knew everybody in the district-different today. His father was a saddler-used to do jobs at different farms-got to love horses. Not many vehicles around-1920 no one on the Jersey Evening Post owned a private car. Newspaper was distributed by horse-1910-got two delivery cars with open sides so delivery people could throw the paper out of the car. Went to the Jersey National School-church school-difficult but accepted it. Jersey french not taught in schools-French was taught-headmistress Miss Bennett was tough but she taught everybody how to read and write. First Record-The Trumpet Voluntary by Jeremiah Clarke-used to listen to it during the occupation on crystal radio sets. Childhood-holidays coincided with the potato season-worked at T & J Moor and the Great Western Railway. At 14 joined the Jersey Evening Post-father got him the job-started as an apprentice printer-Wolfdale printing machines. Newspaper only means of communication at the time. Jersey Evening Post used to be distributed by horses-1910 got first car. Newspaper printed at 3.30 so people could catch the train from Snow Hill to Gorey at 4 o'clock. 1920-took 3 hours to print 7,500 newspapers, today can print 23,000 in three quarters of an hour. Newspapers dropped off at each station both east and west. Exciting to go on the train as a child-sad but inevitable that the railways went when buses were brought in. Tourism in the summer of the 1920s and 1930s-not comparable with today-people used to stay longer. St Brelade popular for tourists. Second Record-the Radetzky March by Strauss. Radio-what he used to listen to. 1930s-became a proof reader at the Jersey Evening Post and wrote some articles-never had an ambition to become a journalist-worked mostly from the printing side. Newspapers today good quality but reporting is 'muck raking' now. Media today-good variety-modern way of life. Spent 15 years as a Constables Officer and Vingtenier in St Saviour and 21 years in St Helier as a churchwarden and on the Welfare Board and on the Battle of Flowers' Association and Jersey Eisteddfod-always involved in something. Honorary policeman-got fed up with job at the time of the prowler-stayed out watching farms at nights. Queen came-did Government House duty all night. Mostly traffic duties. States Police and Honorary Police can work together. Never wanted to leave Jersey-some travelling on the Continent. Has lived in St Helier and St Saviour. Not the same parochialism today. First buses here-used to run through Bagot-used to call it the 'Orange Box'. The JMT and Red Band Bus-opened up the island-created more movement in the island. 1925-1930s-motor cars increased in number. Third Record-Zadoc the Priest from the Coronation Anthem. Second world war-Germans swept across France getting closer to Jersey-hoped nothing would happen but thought it would. Government realised it was impossible to defend and pulled out. Germans took the island-no alternative-no question of resistance-couldn't have sabotage during the occupation-where could you go? Repercussions on other islanders. Had a guilt complex-felt if he'd gone away he may have been able to do something but if everybody had left the island it would have been destroyed. Decided against evacuation-two of his family left but the rest stayed. Continued to work at the Jersey Evening Post-censored by the Germans but the staff used to resist. On the surface looked to be agreeing with them but were resisting. Was asked to put an article in the newspaper but he took three days off and burned it. Fourth Record-Vidor's Toccata and Fugue. During the occupation worked on a farm in the afternoon-used to get some extra food-learned how to make sugar beet syrup. Meat was scarce-used to get some on the black market-used to be expensive but nothing on the price today. Used to listen to the radio every morning-every hour on the hour-would listen until 9 in the morning-used to leave the house and people would tell him the news-everybody knew it. Used to type out 3 copies of the news-took one to Captain Robin of Petit Menage, one to the Jersey Evening Post and kept one. Many people listened to the radio-he would have been prosecuted for disseminating the news. Used to find out news from German soldiers. Fifth Record-To be a Pilgrim. Liberation-can't talk about it without emotion. Enjoyed life since the war-is retired but very active. Enjoys writing-historical and local events. Would have liked to have been a teacher. End of Side One. Personal View with Jack(John) Herbert interviewed by Beth Lloyd, the war time Airport Commander. Enjoyed working at the Jersey Airport. Was born in Bath and went to Green Park College in Bath. Was part of the choir in Bath but gave up his music-difficult to choose music for the programme. Came over to Jersey at 11-his father was an engineer on a ship-his mother wanted him to stay on shore. Worked in Bath and the Piers and Harbours Committee of 1923 advertised for a harbour engineer. Was learning about law but ended up sailing instead- helped the fishermen Tommy and Charlie King and helped the pilots in St Helier Harbour. First Record-Underneath the Arches by Flanagan and Allen. After leaving school joined his father at the Harbour Office. Worked as clerk dealing with harbour dues-counted the passengers coming in. On the Albert Pier with Captain Furzer-a ship collided with the Albert Pier-harbour had to be dredged. Mr Bill Thurgood visited the island-decided to set up an aeroplane route-administration of the aeroplanes were placed under the auspices of the Piers and Harbour Committee-staff had to check beach. First flight took place on the 18th December 1933 from Jersey to Portsmouth. The beach was cleared of people-a great local event. Had a refueler and a coach for the office work. Had to be an English customs officer, Bill Ivy, and a Jersey customs officer, Harold Robins. No aeroplane dues-the aeroplanes used to pay harbour dues. Aeroplane had a tragic accident-a little boy was sitting on the beach and was killed and a coach got trapped on the beach and was swamped by the sea. Second Record-Stranger on the Shore. Used to create a weather report at the Harbour Office by letting a balloon go into the air and timing it going in to cloud cover. Sites inspected to build Jersey Airport-a site at Grosnez turned down. Site at St Peter decided-problem with fog. No other suitable place in the island for it. Jersey Airport-Piers and Harbour Committee was put in charge of the Airport being built-plans were approved-there were four runways-Jersey Airways ran from Jersey to Portsmouth and Jersey to Heston. Air France went from the Jersey Airport. Third Record-Glenn Miller and American Patrol. Second world war-all messages came in code. Bill Lawford-an air traffic control officer came over. Had to camouflage the airport. Jersey Airways staff evacuated-was in charge of the evacuation-no panic at the Airport to get off the island-between 400-600 left by the Airport. Was ordered to stay at his post, Chris Phillips, an air traffic controller, was called back to the royal navy. Late May some French air force plane with two highly ranked officers and a ground crew. The morning of the 1st June in his office when he saw a german plane fly over and dropped a container-it was addressed to the Bailiff of Jersey. German landed and spoke to the Bailiff-wanted the island to be handed over later that afternoon-put up white flags. Jack Herbert told to cut off the electricity supply-had shipped all their radios to Bristol. Fourth Record-Luftwaffe March. Jack Herbert was transferred to the Transport Office in Bond Street during the occupation-converted some vehicles to use gas as fuel-had to improvise to create fuel as it was in such short supply. Fifth Record-It Must be Him by Vikki Carr. Liberation-transferred back to the Jersey Airport on May 10th 1945-airfields were mined and booby traps-were cleared. German officer detailed to cut the grass at the Airport. Royal air force officer was in charge of Airport and it was handed over 2nd October 1945. Civil aviation picked up between 1948 and 1952. The airport was tarmacked in 1952-the material came from the excavation of the Jersey Underground Hospital. The Jersey Airport became the second busiest airport in Britain in the 1960s. Was presented with an MBE by the Queen in 1974 and retired in 1975.

Reference: R/07/B/3

Date: 1982 - 1982

Personal View of Rene Liron, official of the Jersey Transport and General Workers Union, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Represents 6,000 people in the union in all different industries. Not as political as UK but did protest over the pensioner's bonuses getting cut-no party politics in Jersey. Never had a political strike. Workers better off in Jersey compared to the UK-higher wages. His relationship with management-some rows. First record-The Strawbs with Part of the Union. Born in Grouville and went to school and left at 14. Occupation-had to earn his living as a baker's boy for Tom Gilbert-delivered bread. Not enough flour to do the baking-bread was rationed. People used to buy bread from the black market. Occupation-people were very friendly-made his own fun. Lack of freedom-angry and patriotic. Was caught out after curfew with Gordon Rabet and 7 other friends and had to go to Bagatelle House-were fined. Was summoned to College House and asked if he wanted to work in Alderney as a baker but refused. Thought about escaping but decided against it. Second Record-Louise by Maurice Chevalier. Joined the Royal Air Force after the occupation-wanted to get away. Was trained at Greenham Common. Came back to Jersey as his mother was dying of cancer. Was in the RAF for three years but didn't go abroad. Took up a variety of jobs-parish of St Helier-introduced to the trade union-become a shop steward and chairman of the district committee. Monty Purse retired as official of the TGWU-didn't think he had a chance-was interviewed in Southampton by Jack Jones and was named as successor a fortnight later. Gave up his job and became the official. Third Record-Roses of Picady. The union has grown since he took over through hard work. Less disputes in Jersey than in the UK because we are an island and know each other better. Difficulty in seeing everybody's point of view-some people don't tell him the truth. Strikes are a calculated risk-people need to have the right to strike. The union is still as important today as ever-people need protecting. Needs protection in the weaker areas-hotel workers. Interested in the Portuguese community-were treated badly-now they're member of the union. Doesn't think the freedom of movement in Europe will make a difference to people. Fourth Record-Nine to Five by Sheena Easton. He doesn't visit the UK to meet other officials-they run the island without outside interference. Two Labour MPs visited the island on a fact finding mission-he told them to deal with their problems in the UK. Ran for senator and deputy but didn't get in-learned a lot from the election-an opportunity to say what you want. Room for improvement in the States of Jersey. May run for the States again. Fifth Record-'The Heat Is On'. Never wanted to leave the island to further his career. Hasn't decided how long he is going to stay as the representative of the trade union. Fishes on his boat in his spare time. Tries not to show it when he loses his cool. Sixth Record-You by Andy Williams. Gets satisfaction from working and satisfying his members and then handing over to somebody else. End of Side One. Personal View of John Stebbings, 'Mr Sea Link'. Came from Yorkshire-son of a railwayman-used to ride and drive the steam engines. Born in Thornton outside of Bradford and moved to the outskirts of Bradford until he got married. Joined the railways when he was 14. Remembers going to work in short trousers. Used to take the chain horse down to the bottom of the hill-happy days-beginning of the second world war. Then moved over to be a messenger boy. Worked short hours-the railway unions were good-used to work an 8 hour day. As a porter-train loads of traffic came into the shed in the morning and was then sorted and delivered and as a messenger boy he took letters about. First Record-Love Divine all Loves Excelling. Never wanted to become an engine driver. Always believed he'd achieve what he wanted to do-went into management. Joined the Royal Navy-was a stores assistant-looked after the food and drink and then went on to an aircraft carrier-HMS Ocean-joined after the second world war. Was in Palestine when the Jews were moving in. He enjoyed his time in the Royal Navy a great deal. Second Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'The Solitaire'. His love for brass bands. After he left the Royal Navy in 1947 he went back home and got married in 1950. Worked as a station master at Alverthorp and then Haig-used to get up at 4 o'clock to open the station-was the youngest station master in Britain at this time. Wore a station master uniform. Had a station master's house in 1950-was his first step in railway management. Changed the region he was working in. Duties as a station master-attending trains, selling tickets, budget control of the station and getting involved with the trains. Third Record-Billy Cotton with the Dam Busters March. Had 170 staff under his control working at South Bank-the steelworks area-marshalling trains. Assistant to the divisional manager of sales in Middlesbrough. 1966-came to Jersey to look after the sea links with the island. Similar to his old job but on ships rather than trains. Had intended to leave after 2 years but fell in love with Jersey. Fourth Record-The Anvil Chorus. He settled into Jersey quickly-he was prepared to work hard-got involved in the community. Believes in the honorary system. The boss of Sea Link-get knocked but you learn to deal with it-loves dealing with people. Was excited when the roll on roll off links were brought in-saved the route. Fifth Record-The Brighouse and Rastrick Brass Band with 'Melodies from the Merry Widow'. Helps with the Battle of Flowers-helps with the administration and loves the exhibits. Has a great community spirit-a family event. Was chairman of the Battle of Flowers' Association-takes up a lot of time. Work starts for the Battle of Flowers on the day after the Battles of Flowers from the previous year. Two daughters-one in Southampton and one in Jersey. Enjoys working on houses and DIY.

Reference: R/07/B/4

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Jurat Barbara Myles, the first woman jurat in Jersey and doctor, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her early childhood. Education-went to nursery school, a foundations school-interrupted by the second world war which led to her going to three different grammar schools. Her father was a doctor of philosophy-worked in insecticides during the war. Her father came over to Jersey after the war to sort out the Colorado beetle problem. Always wanted to be a doctor and was encouraged. First Record-Little Sir Echo-released when the world changed. Almost got sent to America for safety but stayed. Until 1945/46 lived in Maidenhead and then moved to Kent to school. Tried to get in to train as a doctor but was rejected and then worked in a laboratory. Got a place at Trinity College, Dublin as a medical student-ended with 20 women students. Recalls a disruptive patient. Specialists-were some characters and difficult people. Second Record-Ring of Bright Water sung by Val Doonican. After finishing her medical training came to Surrey near where her parents were living to work in anaesthetics-worked in St Peter's Hospital, Cherstey. Met her husband there who was a surgeon. Worked with him in the casualty department. Got married and started working part time locum work. Had her child Caroline in the autumn of 1960 just after they'd moved house. Was in the house 4 or 5 months when a chance for a job in Jersey came up-decided to move across-had no doubts. Worked in a few locum jobs in anaesthetics in the early 1960s. Had more children-second daughter-1962, third daughter-65, son 68. It was fun but hard work-lived at La Rocque. Third Record-Misalliance sung by Flanders and Swan. Offered work-Jersey Family Welfare Association-needed doctors for their clinics-worked with Dr Crill. Now does 2 half days a week. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls-was asked to teach health education to the students. Got involved with the Jersey College for Girls Parent Teacher Association-was the president. 1970-asked to work on the Juvenile Court-12 lay members sat with a magistrate-was trained in it. Working in the juvenile court was distressing-difficult to try and change a child's background. There are no easy answers to help the children-have to get the children at an early age. Fourth Record-Mozart's Symphony No 40. Decided to stand for jurat because of the lack of women in the Royal Court. When the time came at the end of her time in the Juvenile Court was asked to become a jurat by Jurat Hamilton. Stood for jurat but did not get in the first time. Decided to stand again because of the support she received. Was nervous when she became a jurat. Jurats sit in the Royal Court as the Inferior and Superior Number, work on the licensing bench, overseeing the job of curator for people who can't manage their own affairs. When trying a criminal case-can worry her-have to work out what you believe. Retirement of Lester Bailhache there are now no lawyers as jurats-thinks there is a case to have lawyers as jurats. Jurats get together to discuss law changes. Nothing had to change when she became the first woman jurat-big change for the other jurats. Fifth Record-Menuhin and Grapelli with Jealousy. Hobbies-sailing-likes to have a break from the island-visits the Ecréhous and the South of Brittany. Ambitions-would like to write. Used to sing in a quartet. Sixth Record-Vera Lynn with When I Grow too Old to Dream. End of Side One. Personal View with Betty Brooke. Started writing a column for the Evening Post in 1966. Asked by Jim Scriven, the editor of the time, to write a column to interest people in island politics. Considered standing for election-is not a committee person. Has more power as a writer than as a politician. Was born and raised in Aberdeen and when the second world war came she became a wren where she met her husband who was a navy chaplain. Wrote and edited for ship's magazines. Her husband retired from the royal navy in 1957 and came to Jersey to a church. Liked the States of Jersey because the people could make a difference. Started as a signals wren, trained at Rosyth and then moved to Liverpool-difficult time-worked 72 hours a week-lost many friends. Became an instructor in London and trained people for D Day. Was going to marry somebody else and he was supposed to conduct the ceremony before they realised they loved each other. First Record-Kathleen Ferrier with Blow the Wind Southerly. Became a naval chaplain's wife-stationed at HMS Royal Arthur and then moved to Leigh on Solent and then to Malta for 4 years. Became a snooker player of some repute. Became a sort of surrogate mother to the naval recruits. Had to move on after 4 years-adopted a baby at this time. Posted to Devenport and after two years retired and was invited to move to the Aquila Road Methodist Church-became a methodist lay preacher soon after she was married. Second Record-Mozart's Ave Verum. Impressions of Jersey-had always wanted to come to the Channel Islands-had organised to come to Jersey and as they were organising it had an invitation from Aquila Road Church to come and preach. Simon, her son was 3, and they lived at West Park Avenue in The Manse. Loved living in Jersey especially the Jersey people-warmth and friendship. Preached in the methodist churches-in 1966 Barry, her husband, collapsed in the pulpit and died. Life changed dramatically-was widowed with a 12 year old son-was necessary to look at life again. Continued in the church for 11 months until another minister was appointed. Grieved with the congregation. Third Record-Frankie Lane with Do Not Forsake Me from High Noon. In 1966 her life took a new turn-had to work-worked as a freelance journalist-wrote two columns for the Jersey Evening Post. Wrote articles for the Daily Telegraph and for women's magazines. Was correspondent for the South West region in Jersey before Radio Jersey was set up and interviewed people for Channel Television. Fourth Record-Mozart's Violin Concerto. Never felt she wanted to publish a permanent record of her thoughts-has written two books-a thriller and her autobiography-may publish it at some point. Doesn't travel a lot but has relatives in America and loves France. Fifth Record-Pie Jesu. Doesn't like to plan for the future-lives for the present. Would like the prosperity of Jersey to continue. Sixth Record-Nat King Cole with Ramblin' Rose. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/5

Personal View of Police Chief, David Parkinson interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Was brought up in Huddersfield and when he left school went in to an office and then did his national service. Came out at the age of 20 and went back to his old job but was then made redundant. Then decided to join the local police force. Worked on the beat for 3 years and was then selected for mobile patrol duties and worked in various parts in the police force and in 1963 was promoted to sergeant-as a sergeant did patrol work and operation room work. No management training in those days. 1964-Royal Commission into the police force-big changes-number of police forces reduced. Became a different police world-in 1966 had transferred as inspector to the Essex Police Force. First Record-Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Was married 12 months after joining the force in January 1954. The lives of policemen's wives can be very difficult but it depends on the policeman. Moved to the Essex Police Force as an inspector-change from Huddersfield-was a big change of policing. Then moved to the Hertfordshire Police Force-overlap between them and the Metropolitan Police Force. Was a superintendent in Watford. Cooperation between police forces is good although professional rivalry does exist although it does not affect solving crimes. Crime levels rose through the 1960s and 1970s although it has slowed down recently. Policemen were moved off the beat into cars around the mid 1960s and lost contact with the public but have now been moved back. In 1977 reached the rank of Chief Superintendent of Stevenage. Went through a course for chief officers-was made Assistant Chief Constable in the Derbyshire Police Force and then became Deputy Chief Constable from 1977-1983. Second Record-Ted Heath with Don Lusher playing Lush Slide. Personal View with Lieutenant Governor Peter Whiteley interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Had targeted a number of ambitions including making the job as lieutenant governor as relevant to islanders as possible. Has got to know many islanders. Some aspects are like a service job. Was a relaxation after working in the armed forces. Talks of the need to store the archives of the lieutenant governor. First Record-William Boyce Symphony No 5 by the Academy of St Martin in the Field. Originally wanted to become a journalist-second world war came and he dropped it all-gained an understanding of the job. Joined the Royal Marines and eventually became the commander in chief of the Allied Forces Northern Europe. It was a responsibility but didn't worry about it. Has had royal visits to the island-seven since he has been lieutenant governor. Was used to meeting royalty after his previous job. Felt frustrated when the Falklands War was taking place but was satisfied that the people doing the job knew what they were doing. His son was involved and was injured but has now recovered. Threat of nuclear war-can be both helpful and harmful to show films of the possibility. Second Record-Kathleen Ferrier with O Rest in the Lord from Mendelssohn's Elijah. Leaving Jersey next month-advice for the island-need to keep the island beautiful. Believes that the environment makes the man. Need to maintain agriculture. Interest in the work of Gerald Durrell-immense importance. Need to prevent the extinction of animals. Greenpeace-in many cases have spoiled their case by breaking the law and becoming over politicised. Is hopeful for the future. Third Record-Mozart's First Movement of the Piano Sonata No 11 in A Major. Personal View of Reverend Peter Manton, Rector of St John. His family first came to Jersey in 1897 and he was brought up in Jersey. Joined the militia. Went to the Modern School and Victoria College and then joined the Royal Jersey Militia. On the 1st September 1939 was called up at Grouville Arsenal-marked the end of peace days. Pleasant childhood in Jersey-his family was very poor. Caddied for golf in order to make some money. Scouts was the dominating force in his life as a teenager. Went into the army in the second world war. Had wanted to go in to the church since the age of 10. When he was 12 took a weather badge in the scouts which interested him greatly. Ideally he wanted to become a country priest with a weather station which he has now achieved. Got called in to the militia who guarded key points of the island. June 22nd 1940-all shipped to the Isle of Wight. Cut the telecommunication lines before they left. When he left thought he was leaving forever. First record-Morning by Grieg. Went to Grieg's home as chaplain on the Queen Elizabeth II in Norway. Was due to go on a Greek shop but his wife got ill and he had to cancel and they offered him the QE2 as an alternative later. Hard work-1600 people on board and 1200 crew-a lot of troubles to look after. Was happy fighting the German forces because he hated the Nazi doctrine. Had a strict upbringing-when he was 14 met a girl but it was broken up. Met her 20 years later by chance but she was married by then. Thinks there is too much freedom for young people now. Used to go on the train which he enjoyed greatly-inspired him to choose the next record. Second Record-recording of trains. Still interested in railways in England-takes part in trainspotting. It was part of the character and life of Jersey. Could buy a ticket from Snow Hill to Paris via the boat at Gorey Pier. Went off to the second world war-spent time with the Royal Hampshire's. At that time went into a church and made a vow that if he survived the war he would go into the church. Went out on D Day, then went out to India to fight the Japanese. After the war went to a theological college in Oxford-was accepted but was told he was too old by the bishop and that a younger man would give longer service. Joined the Meteorological Office at the Jersey Airport for 13 years. If he had gone into the church he would have been prepared to go wherever he was sent and would have been a better clergyman. Was happy to go into the Met Office-used to work from sunrise to sunset and then did 24 hour watches. Was an interesting job-has pleasure making notes on the weather. Had limited equipment at the end of the war-did a lot of observation of the sky. Had news by the radio of the weather in different parts of the world and then teleprinters. They were able to predict things remarkably accurately. Average rainfall in St John is 33 inches but in La Rocque it was 26 inches-big difference in a small island. Enjoyed his days in the Met Office. After 13 years in the Met Office he was sitting a civil service exam and at that time the Dean of Jersey asked him to reconsider ordination. Was offered promotion at the Jersey Airport but he wanted to wait for the bishop's decision whether to accept him. The Bishop of Winchester interviewed him and he was accepted. Third Record-Miserarie. Became curate of St Mark's Church for five years. Had full theological training at Whitcliffe Hall at Oxford-very disciplined life in college. Could have been sent anywhere but he was drawn back to Jersey-he understood the people he was serving. Helpful to understand parish life-is involved in the parish. Has extra functions than in England-looks after the churchyards and cemeteries. Thinks the church will always be important in island life. Fourth Record-Religious piece of music sung by Paul Phoenix. Was a curate for 5 years and was then invited to take St John's Church-was extremely nervous in take services on his own for the first time. Can be difficult for a first time rector-thought he had done very well for his first funeral but discovered he'd put the body in the wrong grave. Parishioners forgave the mistake. Has been rector of St John's for 17 years. Did not know the parish well previously-only went out there for the first time at 10 years of age. Only happy when he is taking services in church-a feeling of completion. Strong community in St John with the church playing a large part in this. Fifth Record-Pomp and Circumstance No 4. Still maintains his interest in the weather-weather hasn't changed much. The relationship between tides and the weather. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/6

Date: 1982 - 1984

Visit of His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh to the St John's Youth and Community Centre to open the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall commentated on by Mike Vibert on 29/03/1983. Description of the visit of the Prince, a description of the youth centre, children playing badminton, all the St John's School pupils at the event, Le Rocquier Band playing the national anthem. The main building of the centre was open on September 7th 1980 by Wilfred Tomes. Diane Smith commentates outside the centre waiting for the Prince to arrive describing the crowd. Famous visitors to the opening. Cost of the centre-£300,000. Mike Vibert-Duke's 6th visit to the island-describes the other visits. Diane Smith-Prince Philip's car just pulled up-accompanied by Sir Peter Whiteley and Sir Frank Ereaut, the Lieutenant Governor and Bailiff. Welcomed by Constable John Le Sueur and Lady Sheila Butlin, Mrs Le Sueur, Deputy Fred le Brocq, Senator Reg Jeune, head of the Education Committee-unveils the plaque. Prince being guided around the centre. Sees squash being played by Gillian Ferguson and her father and coach Doug Ferguson. Doug Ferguson talking about coaching his daughter, the championships she holds, how she feels about playing in front of Prince Philip. Prince Philip then making his way to the scout room to see demonstrations by the scouts. Beth Lloyd commentating on the Prince's visit to the scout room, Prince Philip meeting Colonel Bill Hall, the Scout Commissioner, talking about the different activities the scouts take part in, looking at tying knot demonstrations, first aid demonstrations, trip to Kenya to build a community building there, Duke of Edinburgh leaves the scout room. Mike Vibert-Duke of Edinburgh viewing a game of badminton, Barry Smith says who is playing in the demonstration games and the badminton club. Famous guests Morecambe and Wise, Dickie Henderson and Danny La Rue. Diane Smith-Prince entering club room, describing the club room. Mike Vibert-Prince standing on the balcony looking at the hall watching the men's badminton. Diane Smith-Prince introduced to the president and chairperson of the Jersey Flower Club Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard who helped decorate the centre. Diane Smith talking to Leah Samson and Viola Trenchard about the amount of members involved in arranging the flowers for the decoration, the time it took, the kind of flowers used and the theme of the decoration, the club which has been going since 1960 with almost 200 members, raising money for charity, organising flower and church festivals and fundraisers and the Woman's Institute of the island deciding to set up the Jersey Flower Club. Prince Philip leaving the club room-heading to the Billy Butlin Memorial Hall. Mike Vibert-waiting for the royal party to enter, La Rocquier School Band play the national anthem. Prince Philip being introduced to the officials of the Centre including Centenier Carl Hinault and Daphne Hinault, Mr and Mrs Angus Spencer-Nairn, Mr and Mrs Richard Dupré. Prince Philip meets officials of St John's School Ron Smith and David Rogers and meeting the school's football team. Meets celebrities and the Committe of the Centre, the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme winners. Speech made about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and each person is called up to collect their awards including Russell Gibaut, Steven Davidson, Duncan Gibaut, Steven Rondel, Alan Cadoret, Lloyd Pinel and Collette Le Riche. Constable of St John, John Le Sueur making a speech about the centre. Prince Philip making a speech about the Duke of Edinburgh award scheme and the opening of the centre. The Royal Party departing and an overview of the rest of the programme being undertaken by the Duke of Edinburgh. The bailiff giving a speech about the islanders leaving to take part in the Falklands War wishing them luck and a safe return. Recording of Winston Churchill's speech announcing Victory in Europe including the liberation of 'our dear Channel Islands'. End of Side One. Personal View of Joan Stevens interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talking about her love of history. Had a happy childhood-was an only child. In the early years moved around a lot as her father was in the army-moved wherever her father's regiment was sent. Moved back to Jersey when she was 12. Jersey became home quickly-lived in Les Pins in Millbrook. Went to school at Jersey College for Girls-was smaller in those days-arrived with French being her worst subject and left with it being her best thanks to Miss Holt. After leaving school went to a family in Lausanne, Switzerland to practice her french. When she came back she got a job at the Société Jersiaise Museum as a secretary typist-became fond of the museum. First Record-Scarlet Ribbons by Kenneth McKellar. Went to West Park Pavilion as a girl and went surfing. Met her husband, Charles Stevens, soon after starting at the museum. He was about to go to Africa with the Administration Service. Met five times before they got engaged and then he went away for 3 years-was love at first sight. Knew he was coming back and so didn't mind that he went away-got married as soon as he got back and then went straight back to Zambia. He travelled around the country-went with him on tour but after having children didn't go with him. Had a number of servants. Enjoyed life in Africa in retrospect but longed for Jersey. Was out in Africa during the occupation. Second world war-was worried about everybody in Jersey-was 18 months before they discovered there second son was born. Heard from them through the red cross messages. War didn't touch them directly in Zambia but saw a great deal of troop movements-was a transit camp-helped the troops as they passed through. Second Record-Impatience by Schubert. Came back to Jersey on leave after the war to see her family in 1947. Came back for good in 1949 so the children could be educated. Her time was taken up with bringing up the family. Took part in some farming on their farm in St Mary on a modest scale. Started researching into old Jersey houses and decided to write a book on the subject. Researched by talking to people in Jersey. Wrote Old Jersey Houses and then 'Victorian Voices'-the Sumner family had papers in their house Belle Vue-gave it to the Museum and was asked to catalogue it. It was made up mainly of the diaries and letter books of Sir John Le Couteur and his family. Books about Jersey don't traditionally sell well but her 'Short History' sold well. Third Record-Silver Swan by Orlando Gibbons. Interested in Jerseymen from the past but wouldn't write about it because it has been covered by Mr Balleine's Biographical Dictionary. Her favourite historical Jersey figure is Sir John Dumaresq who was the lieutenant bailiff-an important figure of the time-was Sir John Le Couteur's grandfather-was the head of the liberal party in Jersey-was a great orator-was sent to plead for the island on 23 occasions-kept diaries in the late 1700s and showed a very human side. Had a large family that he brought up after his wife died when his family was still quite young. Collects a lot of information about individuals and then puts it together to form a picture. Fourth Record-The Gondeliers with 'Take a Pair of Sparkling Eyes'. Balleine's History-it had been out of print for 20 years and nothing had replaced it so they decided to rewrite Balleine-decided to reprint it with additions-things that have happened since Mr Balleine had written and the need to emphasise certain aspects of the book. Marguerite Syvret and her worked together-good to work as a team. Added a great deal but it was woven in to the text. Mr Balleine was not very good at listing his sources and so they had to find all of the sources that he mentioned. Brought out a book with Richard Mayne called 'Jersey Through the Lens' with photographs and explanations. She is working with Jean Arthur on the place names of Jersey. Has three sons in England and a daughter in Jersey-one son is an architect, one is in the Homes Office and one is a freelance cabinetmaker-she tries to see her grandchildren as much as possible. Fifth Record-Danny Kay with Inch Worm. Her daughter lives with her in Jersey-she teaches riding. Jersey has changed a lot-the pressure of population. Believes there is a need to give something back to the community. At the Société Jersiaise Museum-goes to a lot of meetings-very alive in the community-trying to get younger people involved. Involved with the National Trust for Jersey-has the same aims of as the Trust in Britain but is autonomous. Is unhappy that the Queen's Valley flooding has gone through the States with a small majority-would like to see an alternative. Doesn't like the fact that the land is going to be bought by compulsory purchase. Sixth Record-Mario Lanza with Ave Maria.

Reference: R/07/B/7

Date: 1982 - 1983

Personal View of Vi Lort-Phillips, Jersey's lady of the camellias, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Talks about her love of flowers-it came late in life. Lived in London as a child and was not born in Jersey but her maiden name, St Alban, has an Island connection. Born in London. Was in London in 1915-her uncle was the first officer VC. Met Rudolph Valentino as a teenager who kissed her hand. First Record-Mad Dogs and Englishmen by Noel Coward, who she met after going to the dentist and couldn't laugh at any of his jokes. Got married young after both her parent had died at 15 and 15-married a soldier from the Scots Guards. After they married he left the regiment and worked in London and she went travelling-was unusual. Decided to visit Russia with Primrose Harley a friend of hers-learnt russian. Used to be interested in sport-she was very interested in horses. Her husband got polio and was on sticks for a long time-had to give up shooting. She had a motor accident and her foot was crushed so she couldn't continue participating in sport. Second World War-During the Battle of Britain was playing croquet with polish pilots after they returned after their sweeps. Was an air raid warden-she resigned because she was afraid of the dark. Her husband worked in the War Office. Second Record-The Regimental March of the Scots Guards. Came to Jersey in the early 1950s-she didn't know she was going to come-her husband decided to buy a cottage in Jersey when a friend decided not to move there. Her husband had always wanted to live on an island. She sat for Augustus John who drew charcoal drawings of her-drew 12 drawings of her in 9 years-met many interesting people. Was fascinated by his fascination whenever he drew her. Bought La Colline in 1957 and the garden developed gradually. Her interest was triggered off by coming into a bit of money-decided to build a garden in memory of her brother Teddy St Alban who died whilst flying at the end of the war. Has some rare plants in the garden-when she went to Australia, Japan and America-joined the International Camellia Society-got a wonderful reception in Japan. Collected plants from around the world on her travels. Bred a flower called Magnolia Jersey Belle-was adjudged a hybrid. Third Record-Pastoral by Beethoven. President of the International Camellia Society-started in 1961/2 and has just over 1000 members from nearly all temperate zones. There are many kinds of different camellia-in China they use them for medicinal purposes in Japan they are grown as a crop for charcoal and in the west the main use is decoration. They can be flowering for six months of the year. You need to have acid soil for the flowers to grow. Has travelled with the International Camellia Society-had a conference in Jersey, visited Spain and Portugal. This year went with 40 to China for a conference-took 128 camellias to China and planted a Garden of Friendship. Fourth Record-Hole in the Road by Bernard Cribbens. Personal View of Phyllis Haines, headmistress of Helvetia House School. The school has always been run by her family-it was founded by her aunt, 16 years later her mother took it on and after the second world war she took it on. Her origins were mixed-her great great grandfather Etienne Joste on her mother's side came to Jersey in 1793 from Switzerland-set up a bakery and confectionary shop in Halkett Place and became naturalised-it cost 120 livres. He got married to a Jersey girl, Jeanne Le Bas, in 1795. Their grandson Captain Elias Joste bought the house for his elderly parents and educated his nieces, one of the nieces Eva Joste, started the school and her mother continued. Went to school at Helvetia but wasn't taught by her mother, later on went to courses in London and France. Later on specialised in maths with Mr Kellett from Victoria College. Always wanted to be a teacher-both sides of her family were teachers. Her mother and aunt were not trained as teachers. She didn't go to university-no grants. Went to England via the mailboat and went to London and later visited her father's family. First Record-'Love Is Meant to Make us Glad' from Merry England. Was brought in to teach at Helvetia when she was 21/22. The school has always done well. When her aunt started the school she had 5 pupils, before the war 80, after the war 40 and now 95-100. Used to be a secondary school but is now just a primary school. Social life-she loved dancing-used to enjoy dancing at the West Park Pavilion. Was involved in St Helier's Literary Society-flourished before the war-had Amy Johnson coming to speak to them. Before the war they were talking about getting Winston Churchill over to talk to them-would have cost £50. Involved in acting-inherited from her family-helped start a group called the Unnamed Players with Arthur Dethan and Keith Bell and others so that they could put on plays-the first one was 'The Importance of Being Earnest' at Victoria College and Pride and Prejudice for the Literary Society-both produced by Grace Pepin. It wasn't a very big club-about 10 people and stopped when the war started. Enjoyed travelling abroad-one to the Mediterranean and one to the north. Second Record-The Isle of Capri. Decided to stay in Jersey during the occupation-went out to the Jersey Airport and couldn't get an aeroplane and her mother was too old to go on the boat so stayed. Decided to keep the school open-got orders from the Germans that they had to teach German and joined together with St George's School to do so. Because of a lack of food sport was not allowed to be played in schools. She enjoyed the dances during the occupation. Drama flourished during the occupation-helped the population. She joined the Green Room Club during the war and joined the Jersey Amateur Dramatics Club after the war. Every fortnight a performance was taking place and so she appeared a great many shows. She was involved in the Children's Benefit Fund-it came about because some money was made at school and she wanted it to help children and she got in touch with the hospital and they set up a fund under Arthur Halliwell to enable parents to buy rations for their children. Red cross parcels came in at an important time. Just before the war she'd taken part in a play at West Park Pavilion to raise money for the Red Cross International Society and she was glad that they had because later they saved people's lives. During the occupation the most dramatic change was the lack of radios and letters-despite the red cross messages. A lot of her friends were deported. Were aware when D-Day took place-entertainments were stopped but started again later but often the electricity used to fail and people ended up using lighters to light up the stage. Third Record-Rachmaninov's 'Prelude in C Sharp Minor'. End of Side One. Personal View of Diane Postlethwaite, clairvoyant, astrologer and fortune teller. Was taught from an early age to read tarot cards, hands and crystals. Learnt astrology later and she combines all of the disciplines. She was born with the gift and was not well at the age of 3½-became sensitive to people. Astrology is a science and an art and you need to be slightly clairvoyant to do it. Crystal ball-people hold the crystal and then you take them from them and pick up images from it. Tarot cards-you are given formulas for their use. First Record-All Things Bright and Beautiful. Was 3½ when she was told she had the gift-her mother found her in a church sitting up by the altar being very aware. Told her mother she would have a sister and she did. During the war years was separated from her mother and was taught to read tarot cards by a gypsy. Used to read her friend's fortunes. Went to a convent and the reverend mother caught her playing cards and called her 'a child of the devil'. Became a hairdresser but still told people's fortunes. Took it up as a career in her mid 30s-lived in India with her husband and learnt astrology, she met Mother Theresa in India and some Tibetan people who encouraged her to take it up as a career. She had had her eyes opened in India seeing the poverty and suffering that people suffered. Enjoyed her life in India. Second Record-Ravi Shankar. Went to England and Bermuda after leaving India-encountered voodoo which was frightening. Was going to move to South Africa but ended up coming to Jersey. Have been in Jersey for almost 10 years. Did some fortune telling at a Jersey Choir bazaar and her career took off from there. People are interested in fortune telling now-start of the 'Age of Enlightenment'. People looking for an answer-she is used as a crutch by some people. Learnt meditation to remove herself from other people's problems. Is a practicing Christian. When people come to have their fortunes read she starts with their astrology, then reads their hands. Uses tarot cards for general reading. Tries to help people who come to her with illness-their are many psychic healers in the island. Medicine and healing should be used together. People write to her for advice including people with business contracts. Replies to people by using clairvoyance. Third Record-Bob Newhart with 'The Driving Instructor'. Has been called in to use her clairvoyance to help solve crimes. In the 1600s she could have been burnt for being a witch-has experienced witchcraft in the island-goes to the church for help. Is against the use of ouija boards and witchcraft. Can see beyond what other people sees but can switch it off when she is with her family. Has seen things about her family and herself but does not look into them. Her family are tolerant and help her with her work. They can get annoyed with people who impose on them. Fourth Record-Cosmos. Gets involved in spirits in the house-believes a poltergeist is a magnetic force or the spirit of somebody who hasn't moved on-gets a priest out to help get rid of them. Has been to an exorcism. Spiritualism-can fell when people have died. Feels she is here to help people. The church doesn't agree with astrology but she believes in it. Fifth Record-Joyce Grenfell. During the summer visits a lot of Women's Institutes and take part in bazaars. One fete she was put down by a band. Has just bought a computer to help with her job-will programme people onto her computer. Astrology in the newspaper are very general and difficult to do because of different factors. Some people use their gifts to charge a lot of money but she doesn't believe in it. Her grandmother was psychic and so is her sister. Used to play golf and paint but doesn't get time to do them now. Would like to take up art again. She gets involved in her gift when she goes on holiday. Sixth Record-Chariots of Fire by Vangelis. Tells the future of Jersey for the year including predicting vandalism on the ferries to increase, the States of Jersey defence and fisheries will be discussed and we may have a tremor, oil off the coast will be found within two years, peace and environment groups activities will increase and drugs come under jurisdiction-bright year for the Island. Runs through the horoscopes for the year and the predictions for BBC Radio Jersey.

Reference: R/07/B/8

Personal View of Jeremy Mallinson, Director of the Jersey Zoo, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Lived in Jersey for almost 35 years-came over as a youngster with his parents. His father started a wine and spirits business-when he first left school he went into the wine and spirit business. When he came to Jersey he had started boarding school at King's, Canterbury-enjoyed his school life and holiday life. His father and brother was a cricketer-both members of the Jersey Island Cricket Club-his father was the organising match secretary for 12 years-took part in matches. Remembers Ronnie Postill writing an article complimenting him. Also played hockey and took part with boating with the cadet club at St Aubin's-was voted as cadet secretary. His father bought a 1906 cadillac car and he restored it-used to take part in the Battle of Flowers and St Aubin's Fete-it eventually went to America. Was always interested in animals as a child-used to take part in horse riding and took people's dogs for a walk. Wanted to go to Africa to see the animals. When he left school he went into his father's wine business but he was a bad salesman. Met a person on a cricket tour in Jersey who told him he was going to join the Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps-decided that he would join in order to see Africa. First Record-Music Maestro Please by Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen. The Rhodesia and Nyasaland Staff Corps were a small body of trained men that were the regular army of the federation-provided the officers for the Army. His whole objective was to see as many animals as possible. Never can get Africa out of your system. Always had an enthusiasm about animals-was taught by friends in Lusaka. Saw Operation Noah [an operation to save as many animals as possible from an area that was being dammed] in action. Was not a military person-wanted to leave after 3 years although he had enjoyed himself. Was interested in joining the game department but wanted to come back to Jersey and he did in 1958. Second Record-As Time Goes By from Casablanca. Had not heard of Gerald Durrell until his brother gave him 'My Family and Other Animals' in Christmas 1958-was fascinated by the book. Heard Gerald Durrell was going to open a zoo and visited the zoo the second day it opened and wrote to the Superintendent of the Zoo, Kenneth Smith. He was interviewed and given a temporary job during the summer of 1959. He first met Gerald Durrell when he came back from Argentina with his collection on the 9th June 1959. Has gone the whole way through the ranks of the zoo-worked in the bird section for his first 18 months and then the mammals. Important to know what everybody does in a business-good to start at the bottom. The early days of the zoo were exciting and a struggle-had financial difficulty but Gerald Durrell wanted to stay in Jersey. Formed the Trust and gave all of his holdings to it and the proceeds of two books that he had yet to write. He was the founder and director but never got paid for that. Always been interested in primates all the way up to gorillas-his first love at the zoo was Npongo. When a film about gorillas was being shown he took Npongo and held her outside West's Cinema collecting for a mate for her. Third Record-Zambeze. Personal View of Ron Hickman, inventor of the workmate, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Born in South Africa and he was inventing from an early age. Remembers his first invention was a car that had a bridge over them so cars could travel on the same road. His family thought he was a bit made until he had his first burglar alarm that worked well at the age of 16. Was an outdoor person and he enjoyed music-playing the piano and violin. At 12 he became the local church organist. If he didn't become an inventor wanted to become an engineer. When he was 18 he qualified as an associate of the Trinity College of Music in London. Never got as far with the violin. First Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata in A Minor. When he left school he decided to go into the magistrate's office-moved around in different towns for 6 years-enjoyed the experience. Decided to come to England in order to pursue his desires to be come a car designer. When he first arrived in London he got a job in a music store and studied the organ part time. Talked his way into a job with Ford as a model maker-was rejected several times but eventually gave him a chance. Nine months later was promoted on to the drawing boards as a designer and he stayed with Ford for 3 years. Met Colin Chapman who had created the Lotus Car Company and was hired to help. Soon found himself as chief designer and stayed for 9 years. Got on well with Colin Chapman-respected you if you knew what you were doing. Owns a Lotus now. Bought a 1931 V16 Cadillac the previous year-drives around the Jersey roads in it. Second Record-Windmills Of Your Mind by Noel Harrison. Decided to leave Lotus Cars because of the responsibilities-decided to make a break from car design and tried to invent things. The first two inventions-one was a failure and the other was the workmate. His wife Helen backed him in his decision to leave his job. An inventor's working day is varied-have to have an idea, try it out-it gets a life of itself. Thought up the workmate because he was assembling a wardrobe and cut through a chair. There is a need to patent the invention or it becomes public property. The workmate was rejected by 7 British manufacturers and 3 American manufacturers. Black and Decker turned him down but came back to him 4 years later after he had put it into production himself. Had to put his money into it in order to put it into production. It took 6 years to start making money for him. Third Record-An Die Musik sung by Elizabeth Schwarzkopf. Decided to come to Jersey after he made licensing arrangements with Black and Decker-a nice environment to continue inventing in. Found it easy settling in Jersey-tried to run a Jersey company Techron but it lost money and now he runs it on his own. Is working on two major new inventions but are kept secret. He designed his own house in St Brelade-bought an old house with a good site and then designed his house with his wife and the architect. Have many inventions in the house-all for practical use. Created a fault reporting panel and an error took place without being reported-he discovered it was the fault reporting panel that had gone wrong. His most useful invention is a panel that tells him what doors and windows have been left open. Fourth Record-Morning in Cornwall by James Last. End of Side One. Personal View of Colonel Bill Hall, the Island Commissioner of Scouts who is about to retire, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. He was a scout as a boy-started in 1930. Had an older brother but he wasn't a scout. Joined at 13 and was very enthusiastic. He became involved with the troop after he left school-he was allowed to run the meetings-progressively wanted to start a troop. He persuaded his headmaster to let him run a troop in opposition to the school's troop run by the old boys. Has kept in touch with old boys from the troop. The troop was set up in 1937-he had joined the Territorial Army because he could tell war was coming. In 1938 the scouts were evacuated and when he went off to war the boys carried on running the scout group. Never thought of a career other than scouting-went to a stockbroker's office after finishing school. First Record-Colonel Bogie's March. Was an officer of the Royal Army Service Corps of the Army. Was a captain at the start of the war at the age of 22-was responsible for the supply of ammunition of the defences of the Thames. Later went into the Western Desert-was responsible for carrying ammunition in the second line. The Western Desert was a good place to fight the war-wide open spaces. Met General Charles de Gaulle in Damascus. Later had a similar job in Western Europe-went to Malta for a while and later to France after D-Day. Second Record-The Slave's Chorus from Nabucco. After the war had ended-came out in the Spring of 1946-was given an office in Phillips and Drew and worked there for 25 years. Rejoined the Scouts and became a Commissioner in Camberwell and rejoined the Territorial Army. Got married in 1953. His role as a stockbroker was to advice people what to do with their money. Was involved in magistrate's court and the youth court in London-became a JP. In a court if a punishment is imprisonment they can challenge the decision in a higher court. Realised that deprived children often suffered from a lack of parental control. Third Record-Music recorded at a Greek jamboree. Has been on two jamborees-a jamboree in Greece was exciting-took on the task of a World Jamboree in Marathon, Greece-helped organise the camp, had good fun, Prince Constantine opened the Jamboree. Went to Corfu after the Jamboree. Personal View of Dr Anthony Essex-Cater, Jersey's Medical Officer of Health, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. The role of Medical Officer of Health is looking at the community from a preventative point of view-establish the patterns and causes of diseases. The doctors don't come under his jurisdiction-their help is important to him in his work and vice versa. Medical Officers of Health are long established appointments-go back a 100 years-dropped the name in England in the 1970s reforms. Jersey decided to stick to the old title. Didn't always want to study medicine-his father was a writer and journalist but he also had an interest in medicine and decided to go into that area of work. He was at school during the war and had to make the decision whether to continue. Originally thought of going on a short service commission to Oxford and was interviewed by Wing Commander Cecil Wright who suggested to learn medicine. First Record-A Symphonic Study by Elgar. Was in London at the end of the war studying to be a doctor-was interested in sport, played a lot of rugby. Was a general course for training so didn't have to decide a speciality until later but was interested in paediatrics. Before he qualified he got married-his wife Jane was a student nurse at Charing Cross Hospital and because she married him she was forced to leave the hospital as it was not allowed. He went into the Royal Air Force Medical Branch for 18 months and was stationed in Wiltshire. When he left he got a job in a hospital in Bath. He joined up as part of his national service. His role at Bath was as a house officer and then he moved to London to a paediatric hospital. When he was in London he did a diploma in Child Health. Decided to move from child health to public health because of the lack of prospects in paediatrics. Got a public health job in Croydon. Needed to get further qualification-gained a scholarship for the London School of Hygiene at the University of London. Was there for a year and also studied occupational health. After that year had to refuse an opportunity to go to Harvard University. Second Record-Prelude No 1 by Villa Lobos. Left Croydon and went to Swansea where he was Deputy Medical Officer of Health-very pleasant place to live. His 3 children enjoyed living in Swansea-stayed for 5 years. He then moved to Birmingham in order to progress-began to lecture at the Children's Hospital in Birmingham about the health of children. Interest in anthropology-has been a fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain for nearly 40 years. Has an interest in races-now medical anthropology is now recognised as an important discipline. Then moved to Manchester to become Deputy Medical Officer of Health-enjoyed the theatre of music of Manchester-the problems were similar to those in Birmingham. He was awarded a Council of Europe Medical Fellowship-gave him an opportunity to travel in Scandinavia to study their health system-looked at port health and child health. After Manchester went to Monmouthshire. He was only one of three Medical Officer of Health in a 90 year period. In 1974 took part in the reorganisation of the National Health Service-he was appointed a Member of the Steering Committee for Wales to work out the details of the reorganisation. Felt there was a failure by the government to listen to the steering committee. Fourth Record-Weber's Clarinet Quintet in B Flat Major

Reference: R/07/B/9

Date: 1983 - 1985

Personal View of Bailiff Sir Peter Crill, interviewed by Hamish Marett-Crosby. Has an eclectic musical taste-chosen his records because they are a cross section of music that he likes-he enjoys singing. Used to compete in the Jersey Eisteddfod and now sings in church choirs. Was involved in theatrical productions-started acting at Victoria College-didn't take part during the occupation-didn't want to play to the german soldiers. Took it up again after the war at Oxford University. Helpful to have acted if you want to be an advocate-useful when speaking to a jury. Education suffered during the occupation-there was a shortage of teachers. Pays tribute to the headmaster Mr Tatum who stayed through the occupation. Was moved to Halkett Place Infant School in 1941. Was a teenager so remembers the occupation well-had all night parties despite the curfews. Escaped to France in a boat before the end of the occupation with two friends-between 50-60 did this. Only one real escapee, Denis Vibert, who got to England in 1941. Went to England from France-their information about the hunger in the island and a report by the Bailiff, Lord Coutanche, helped persuade the authorities to allow the red cross ship the SS Vega to come to the island. First Record-Handel's Water Music Suite. Read law at Oxford University-went up in 1945 with the aid of the Howard Davis Trust. He rowed when he was at Oxford in the Head of the River Race. Was called to the Bar in 1949 and called to the Jersey Bar in the same year. Later brought in local examination-there wasn't when he joined. Was on the committee to created the deputy bailiff and became deputy bailiff later. Second Record-Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet. Reached the conclusion in 1954 to create the post of deputy bailiff-Mr Harrison was the first deputy bailiff, Sir Robert Le Masurier became lieutenant bailiff before becoming bailiff. The second deputy bailiff was Mr Bois [Francis de Lisle] who was appointed in 1963, then Sir Frank Ereaut and then himself. The law has a weight of tradition-he keeps up the tradition but cuts it down, for example, the assize d'héritage-lost its meaning by leaving twice a year-decided to hold it only once a year-added a service and bailiff's reception at the time of the assize d'héritage to add more importance to it. Bailiff performs the role of presiding officer of the States. He was a deputy for 9 years-took a break because his father was ill-has seen it from the benches as well. He was also solicitor and attorney general for 12 years. Finds it difficult to stop speakers repeating themselves-the bailiff has the power to stop members from speaking. There is a need to observe standing orders. There is a rule that speeches should not be read-some people do nonetheless. Third Record-Chopin's Polonaise in C Sharp Minor. Jurats left in 1948 but the constables still sit in the States-wouldn't make a difference if they were elected to the States rather than elected as heads of the parish and sit in the States as virtue of the office. Constables are the oldest members of the States-doesn't want to lose constables as it is a link to the past. The problem with constables sitting in the States is that they are police officers-there's a possible question over the fact that 12 policemen make up a quarter of the States. The country parishes have retained their former way of life more than the urban parishes-in the urban parishes the role of honorary police is much more difficult to maintain. Has noticed a change since the radio started broadcasting the States sittings-more people have started speaking and for longer. Jersey was affected by the French Revolution-progressive parties were formed although it didn't crystallise into definite parties-there was left and right within the States. The States may have been built in a circular so no people were directly facing others in opposition. Fourth Record-A Piece from Aida. The States was also designed so that all of the different groups, senators, deputies, constables, could sit together. There have been groups in the past from the left and right. During the second world war two groups emerged-the Jersey Progressive Party who wanted reform and the Jersey Democratic Movement, who were further to the left. Progressive Party got 17 members in the first post war States-carried out their reforms and then disbanded-they achieved their objective and decided that they did not want to continue as a political party. In the States today he doesn't notice any individual groupings. A difference in degree and not complete opposed political viewpoints. Fifth Record-Bach's Prelude and Fugue in G Minor. Was for 5 years the president of the Société Jersiaise-helped create the Jersey Heritage Trust. The Société wanted to remain as the learned society but could not show all of its collections off properly and in accordance with modern thinking in museums. The Société built an education room but it never got off the ground. When he took over he made it clear that members had a choice-it could remain as a learned society or it could become a trustee of all the acquisitions that they had and receive help-from this the Jersey Heritage Trust was created. The Jersey Heritage Trust was supposed to be a channel of funds from the States to other cultural bodies in the island-believes a grant should be granted to someone like the poet Jeremy Reed. Enjoys music, books, horses, boats and pottering about. Doesn't use a computer now. Does still cycle in the summer. Sixth Record-Gilbert and Sullivan-The Overture to the Gondoliers.

Reference: R/07/B/10

Date: July 11th 1982 - July 11th 1982

Personal View of Senator Reg Jeune, President of the Education Committee. Born and brought up in Jersey-remembers difficult days of the late 1920s and 1930s-early life. Remembers a home with little money but very happy. It was a strict methodist home and his parents gave him a good start in life. His father had two hobbies-his garden and prize poultry. He got involved in his father's hobbies-he got involved with prize bantams in the local agricultural show. Has carried methodism throughout his life-has been a methodist local preacher for 40 years starting in 1942. Remembers the weather being nicer in his childhood-spent a lot of time on the beach and cycling around the island. Played tennis, watched cricket matches at the Victoria College Field when some of the top cricketers came to the island. Lived in Don Road and then in Georgetown as a child. He went to the De La Salle College-he was always encouraged to read books. He remembers going to the junior library with his mother where a Miss Priestley worked-never lost that interest. Thought that he may become a teacher but it was difficult getting grants at that time. His parents were ambitious for him-gave him a lot of encouragement. First Record-The Hallelujah Chorus from Handel's Messiah. Used to sing the piece of music in a choir-enjoyed being a chorister. At school-was interested in sport but was never particularly good. Left school to go into a bank-in waiting he went into Hill Street and then fell in love with law and took that up. Many of his fellow pupils went into a bank-it's much easier now. Studying was a struggle-graduated as a solicitor of the Royal Court of Jersey in 1945-a great deal of the examination was in French-was very difficult. Learnt French in order to be a solicitor. He was an office boy in Hill Street at first-used to collect rentes and write out contracts on parchment. Still sees the contracts that he used to write out. The occupation arrived-they were looking after people's affairs who had left the island-he started taking an active interest in cases after the second world war. It could take several years to study to qualify as a lawyer-took 6-8 years. Church took up quite a bit of time-choir and lay preaching. After he'd qualified he married in 1946 to Monica Valpy. Second Record-Flight of the Bumblebee by Rimsky-Korsakov. Hill Street was quiet during the occupation-had little to do-didn't experience hassle from the germans-helped look after people's affairs who had evacuated. He became a partner in a practice with two other men Helier Mourant and Clifford du Feu and created a company called Mourant, du Feu and Jeune-built up a substantial partnership. Started as a family practice until the financial scene came to Jersey-he became involved. It started around the early 1960s-he got interested when he got asked advice and he gradually became interested. He became chairman of the Youth Movement in 1947 and was involved in other organisations such as the Rotary Club-was interested in politics. Has always been interested in education and youth services. At one point thought that he may have gone into the church-if the occupation hadn't come along he may have done. Hadn't travelled much at this time-he'd been to Guernsey in England and that was all-after he qualified the opportunities to travel increased. He has now made many travels including extensively around the United States of America. Third Record-The Grand March from Verdi's Aida. Has been involved as much as possible with his family-his eldest son is a partner with him who has two daughters, his second son is London and has become an actor and his daughter is a jewellery designer who has come back to Jersey. Encouraged his son to read law. Tried to become a States member of St Helier No 2 District in the late 1950s but was unsuccessful. In 1962 he was successful in a by-election of St Helier No 3 District. Wasn't put off going into the States when he didn't get in the first time. Strange to go into the States especially in a by-election-the house was already set. Was nervous and excited the first time he spoke in the States despite having done a lot of public speaking in his job and church. After six months became president of the Public Works Committee-he had attacked the spending of money at the time especially for the tunnel-the money got thrown out and as a result two committees resigned-the Island Development Committee and the Public Works Committee and he became president of the Public Works Committee-he had been president of major committee ever since. Investigated the traffic problems in St Helier and eventually decided there should be a tunnel built under Fort Regent. Fourth Record-Le Rocquier School Band with Rock Around the Clock. Has a great love of music and books-still reads a lot despite working hard. The law firm has grown-he has become detached from the day to day business of the firm-tries to get there as much as possible-misses it. Became involved with the Trustees Savings Bank-joined the local board about 25 years previously and then became chairman of the Jersey Savings Bank, chairman of the Channel Islands Savings Bank and then elected to the board in London. Goes to two meetings a month in London. Received the OBE for his services to the savings banks-was very thrilled. Enjoyed going to Buckingham Palace to receive the award. Wants Jersey to retain its character but not to be insulated-he's chairman of the Executive Committee of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association and involved with the French side of the parliamentarians. Fifth Record-Treorky Male Voice Choir. Has been involved in bringing an ombudsman into the States-succeeded-there is now a Review Tribunal. Doesn't have many more great ambitions in the States-is at the service of the States. Thinks it would be almost impossible to set higher education up in Jersey-Highlands College and what it offers with further education is about the limit that Jersey can expect. End of Side One. Personal View of Senator Ralph Vibert, interviewed by Beth Lloyd. Is the father of the house and president of the Finance Committee. At school-pictures that he would be a teacher-went to Victoria College in the 1920s-was captain of the football and head prefect. Didn't get a scholarship to Oxford University-Lord Coutanche was reorganising the States departments and set up the Law Officers-he became a secretary for the Attorney General-decided to become a lawyer. Was secretary to Lord Coutanche during the day and studied law in the evening. Was called to the bar in 1933/34-set up a private practice on his own. First Record-Welcome Song of the Maori People of New Zealand. Has not been to New Zealand but his daughter has. Has travelled a great deal-enjoys it. Had a law practice in Hill Street in the 1930s-business was quite slow-people paid on time. His first client was the late Senator Edward Le Quesne who was trying to get compensation from a shipping company when a boat broke down travelling to France. In the 1930s became interested in the movement of Moral Rearmament-was given a new conception of Christianity-it enables Christians to work with other people of faith throughout the world. Moral Rearmament took part in the bringing of democracy to Zimbabwe. Second Record-Unofficial National Anthem of all of Africa. He is well known in the Swiss village of Caux because it is the world conference centre of Moral Rearmament. Believes that when people work together good things come of it. His wife and he went to Zimbabwe to help friends-they had met Alec Smith-the son of a prime minister and a drug addict-through the attention of Kit Prescott, a friend, he stopped being an addict and became a leading statesman. During the occupation he evacuated in order to enlist-his wife was undecided-in the end she decided to leave. His wife had a baby and he joined up-got into a school of cipher breaking-60 pupils were in the first ever course held on this and only 3 were good enough-he didn't make the grade but they wanted people who could speak french and could teach ciphers to people in the field who were behind enemy lines. Later moved to India to become instructor training people to work behind enemy lines. Worked for the Special Operations Executive-met Maurice Buckmaster who was head of the French Section. His brother Denis escaped to England during the occupation and then joined the Royal Air Force. Third Record-Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. When the war was finished he helped clear up with the courts and then he got back in late 1946. Went back into his law practice. He became solicitor-general in 1948 until 1955-decided not to continue to become bailiff-had differences with the attorney-general Cecil Harrison and decided to leave. Believes those years were wasted years-he could have built up a practice at that time. Went back into private practice with his younger brother. Decided to go into politics because he wanted a hand in running the island. Fourth Record-Mozart's Piano Sonata No 11. His wife, Muriel Vibert, née Le Gros, has been a big support all his life. Became a deputy for St Brelade in 1955 and 2 years later became a senator in an uncontested by-election. Has always been invited onto committees-the sudden death of George Troy led him to become President of Defence, the collapse of the Establishment Committee led to him taking it on and the sudden death of Cyril Le Marquand led to him being President of Finance. Also was President of the Common Market Committee. Constant change of personnel in the States-new wave of people coming to the States typified by Senator Shenton who have brought new life to the States and a desire to do things quickly. Thinks more businessmen should be in the States but it's difficult as they are often too busy to get to States sittings. Dislikes important decisions being rushed through without due consideration. Likes the Jersey system-believes it's a very democratic system. Likes the tradition of the honorary system. Instigated the concept of a minimum income for States members-people could become members of the States without fear of financial difficulties-wouldn't like to see all the States members becoming professionals. Believes the parishes should keep their autonomy. Fifth Record-Manhattan Beach by Sousa. As a hobby he enjoyed playing tennis, likes to garden and play with the grandchildren. One of his daughters is a freelance photographer-became interested in photography. Was awarded the OBE in 1977 and became father of the house in 1980-has no more political ambitions. Believes Jersey's political future should be secure. Sixth Record-An Anglican Hymn. Commentary on the Battle of Britain Red Arrow display by Squadron Leader Henry Ploszek. Talks about the distance that the Red Arrows stay away from each other in the display, the training for formation flying, as manager he organises the administrative duties. End of Side Two.

Reference: R/07/B/11

Date: 1982 - 1982

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